The Big Buy-In: How a City and Its Citizens Got Smart About Water | People for Smarter Cities
It’s no secret that the world’s freshwater resources are limited and decreasing. At the same time, domestic consumption and water waste are increasing. In the U.S., a typical household consumes about 260 gallons a day, most of which could be significantly reduced through small behavioral changes. But getting citizen buy-in is not an easy task. Here’s how one city spurred its residents to take action.

The Big Buy-In: How a City and Its Citizens Got Smart About Water | People for Smarter Cities

It’s no secret that the world’s freshwater resources are limited and decreasing. At the same time, domestic consumption and water waste are increasing. In the U.S., a typical household consumes about 260 gallons a day, most of which could be significantly reduced through small behavioral changes. But getting citizen buy-in is not an easy task. Here’s how one city spurred its residents to take action.

Using Big Data to Make Education Smarter | P4SC
Numbers have always been a core part of any education. Now with smart analytics, schools can harness the power of data to better measure and track student performance in real time. Read how that adds up to fewer dropouts at one school system that has instituted a program of prevention through prediction.

Using Big Data to Make Education Smarter | P4SC

Numbers have always been a core part of any education. Now with smart analytics, schools can harness the power of data to better measure and track student performance in real time. Read how that adds up to fewer dropouts at one school system that has instituted a program of prevention through prediction.

The Sidewalk of the Future Is Not So Concrete | CityLab
Some cities have started to rethink the traditional sidewalk. Local governments and technology companies all over the world are considering new ways of building pedestrian pathways that go beyond the common mix of cement and aggregate we know as concrete. These materials have broadened not only how cities construct sidewalks but also the very notion of what a sidewalk can be. They can now enhance walkability, generate renewable energy, and improve public safety, even as they withstand all those tree roots that have been breaking concrete slabs for decades.

The Sidewalk of the Future Is Not So Concrete | CityLab

Some cities have started to rethink the traditional sidewalk. Local governments and technology companies all over the world are considering new ways of building pedestrian pathways that go beyond the common mix of cement and aggregate we know as concrete. These materials have broadened not only how cities construct sidewalks but also the very notion of what a sidewalk can be. They can now enhance walkability, generate renewable energy, and improve public safety, even as they withstand all those tree roots that have been breaking concrete slabs for decades.

How Parking Spaces Are Eating Our Cities Alive | CityLab

How much space does your car take up?

A new production from Streetfilms and transportation nonprofit ITDP breaks it down Schoolhouse Rock-style: The average parking space requires about 300 square feet of asphalt. That’s the size of a studio apartment in New York, enough room to hold 10 bicycles.