The New York City Building at the Centre of the Internet | This Big City
Last week, a news story started doing the rounds about how the internet weighs the same as a strawberry.  And whilst this makes an awesome headline, it is totally not true.  Behind the seemingly immaterial internet lies an incredible physical  infrastructure, part of which New York based filmmaker Ben Mendelsohn  features in his new documentary ‘Bundled, Buried, and Behind Closed Doors’.
Ben’s short film focusses on Lower Manhattan’s 60 Hudson Street -  one of the world’s most concentrated hubs of Internet connectivity.  Within this ordinary looking building, huge amounts of data are  exchanged, essentially keeping us all online. Last week, I was lucky  enough to get the opportunity to ask Ben about his work, the future of  the internet, and life before the fusion of urban and online  interactions.
This Big City: One of your interviewees mentioned the  importance of remembering the physical nature of the internet, and you  expressed a feeling that ‘something important’ is happening at 60 Hudson  Street. How could we do a better job of celebrating the incredible  physical system that the internet has grown into? Or should it remain  behind the scenes?

The New York City Building at the Centre of the Internet | This Big City

Last week, a news story started doing the rounds about how the internet weighs the same as a strawberry. And whilst this makes an awesome headline, it is totally not true. Behind the seemingly immaterial internet lies an incredible physical infrastructure, part of which New York based filmmaker Ben Mendelsohn features in his new documentary ‘Bundled, Buried, and Behind Closed Doors’.

Ben’s short film focusses on Lower Manhattan’s 60 Hudson Street - one of the world’s most concentrated hubs of Internet connectivity. Within this ordinary looking building, huge amounts of data are exchanged, essentially keeping us all online. Last week, I was lucky enough to get the opportunity to ask Ben about his work, the future of the internet, and life before the fusion of urban and online interactions.

This Big City: One of your interviewees mentioned the importance of remembering the physical nature of the internet, and you expressed a feeling that ‘something important’ is happening at 60 Hudson Street. How could we do a better job of celebrating the incredible physical system that the internet has grown into? Or should it remain behind the scenes?

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