Public voting is now open for NYC BigApps 3.0! We received nearly 100 submissions this year, a new record. Browse the gallery to see the submissions and vote daily through Wednesday, March 8th for your favorite app to win the Popular Choice award.

As part of the City’s ongoing efforts to increase transparency in government, and to improve the quality of life for New Yorkers and visitors, BigApps 3.0 made more than 230 new datasets available from more than 60 City agencies, commissions, and business improvement districts, for a total of nearly 750 data sets for developers, available at NYC Open Data.

Thirteen prizes will be awarded in total, including two Popular Choice Application winners. Winners will receive cash prizes totaling $50,000. We’re also giving away two NY Tech Meetup demo slots, two TechStars finalist spots, and membership in the first BigApps Founders Network, to provide mentorship, networking, and business support services to help the winners get their startup businesses off the ground.
For more info, visit www.nycbigapps.com. Don’t forget to vote!

nycedc:

Public voting is now open for NYC BigApps 3.0! We received nearly 100 submissions this year, a new record. Browse the gallery to see the submissions and vote daily through Wednesday, March 8th for your favorite app to win the Popular Choice award.

As part of the City’s ongoing efforts to increase transparency in government, and to improve the quality of life for New Yorkers and visitors, BigApps 3.0 made more than 230 new datasets available from more than 60 City agencies, commissions, and business improvement districts, for a total of nearly 750 data sets for developers, available at NYC Open Data.

Thirteen prizes will be awarded in total, including two Popular Choice Application winners. Winners will receive cash prizes totaling $50,000. We’re also giving away two NY Tech Meetup demo slots, two TechStars finalist spots, and membership in the first BigApps Founders Network, to provide mentorship, networking, and business support services to help the winners get their startup businesses off the ground.

For more info, visit www.nycbigapps.com. Don’t forget to vote!

nycedc:

Next American City » Columns » To Build or Not To Build (Custom Apps)
To the delight of open government advocates everywhere, an increasing number of cities and towns across the country (and around the globe) are embracing the idea of open data. Yet, data itself is usually just a starting point, and while there are usually a handful of people happy to have access to raw numbers, simply publishing a data catalogue online is not exactly helpful to most citizens. To make open data worthwhile, you need worthwhile applications that use the data in question. Thus, the issue most cities encounter once they’ve decided to unlock their data is what to do about applications. Anyone interested in open government has probably come across some very cool applications that make use of public data (some fun examples here, here and here). Yet, building applications can be expensive and complicated, and many cities lack the budget and expertise to commission such projects (let alone ensure that they will result in useful tools). So most cities have sought out help from third parties.

Next American City » Columns » To Build or Not To Build (Custom Apps)

To the delight of open government advocates everywhere, an increasing number of cities and towns across the country (and around the globe) are embracing the idea of open data. Yet, data itself is usually just a starting point, and while there are usually a handful of people happy to have access to raw numbers, simply publishing a data catalogue online is not exactly helpful to most citizens. To make open data worthwhile, you need worthwhile applications that use the data in question. Thus, the issue most cities encounter once they’ve decided to unlock their data is what to do about applications. Anyone interested in open government has probably come across some very cool applications that make use of public data (some fun examples here, here and here). Yet, building applications can be expensive and complicated, and many cities lack the budget and expertise to commission such projects (let alone ensure that they will result in useful tools). So most cities have sought out help from third parties.

If you live in a city of reasonable size, there are probably developers who have already built mobile applications that make it easy and fun to interact with information about the place where you live. But how do you find them?

Just launched this week, Appify.com, a marketplace, discovery platform and innovation engine for local mobile apps.  I’m excited to be working on something I believe people will find useful, and that will help make cities a bit smarter, and our lives a bit easier.

For now, it’s fun to get feedback and suggestions from friends and colleagues, and read supportive articles like Appify: A City-by-City App Store.  Join us in January when we launch our more public site.

(via dannyshapiro)