Crazy Skyscrapers That Will Shape The Skylines Of The Future | FastCompany

As the world’s population moves into cities in the coming decades, tall buildings will become ever more important. Each year, eVolo Magazine challenges architects to predict what that skyscraper-filled future will look like. Since its launch in 2006, the Skyscraper Competition has attracted over 5,000 entries. 
Check out the full list of winners and runners-up for 2013 here

Crazy Skyscrapers That Will Shape The Skylines Of The Future | FastCompany

As the world’s population moves into cities in the coming decades, tall buildings will become ever more important. Each year, eVolo Magazine challenges architects to predict what that skyscraper-filled future will look like. Since its launch in 2006, the Skyscraper Competition has attracted over 5,000 entries. 

Check out the full list of winners and runners-up for 2013 here


“The Revolution Has Begun: How Kickstarter Is Changing Architecture
By David Hill.  October 18, 2012. 
How do you raise money for a civic design project these days? You can go the traditional route—apply for a grant, make a pitch to city officials, befriend a wealthy patron—or, you can try your hand at crowdfunding. A growing number of architects are doing just that, turning to Kickstarter (see our curated profile here), the popular crowdfunding website for creative types, to generate both cash and buzz. It’s an approach that makes a lot of sense in today’s limping economy. Read more.
Take the Lowline. That’s the nickname for a proposed underground park that would be built in a former trolley terminal, unused since 1948, in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Designer James Ramsey discovered the space several years ago and immediately saw its potential for a kind of subterranean High Line—the popular park built on an abandoned rail trestle. Ramsey and his partner, Dan Barasch, presented their idea to a receptive Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which controls the space, but they realized they needed to build community support to take the project to the next level.
That’s where Kickstarter comes in. Earlier this year, Ramsey and Barasch created a Kickstarter campaign to raise $100,000, which would pay for a full-scale model of the park. Depending on the amount pledged, backers would receive T-shirts, tote bags, even a gourmet dinner prepared by Ramsey (three backers qualified for that perk).
“The response was overwhelming,” Ramsey says. “We hit our goal in eight days.” In fact, they raised $155,186, more than enough to pay for construction of a model, which went on display in a Manhattan warehouse for one week in September.
“Kickstarter was transformative for us,” Ramsey says. “It wasn’t just a way to raise money. It also functioned as a kind of marketing tool for a grassroots campaign.” Ramsey believes that crowd funding has the potential to be transform the way civic projects are financed. “Instead of one crotchety, crabby developer calling all the shots,” he says, “the client is thousands and thousands of people who care about the project. It’s much more democratic.”
Via: Architizer & massurban
Image: Matter Architecture Practice 

“The Revolution Has Begun: How Kickstarter Is Changing Architecture

By David Hill.  October 18, 2012. 

How do you raise money for a civic design project these days? You can go the traditional route—apply for a grant, make a pitch to city officials, befriend a wealthy patron—or, you can try your hand at crowdfunding. A growing number of architects are doing just that, turning to Kickstarter (see our curated profile here), the popular crowdfunding website for creative types, to generate both cash and buzz. It’s an approach that makes a lot of sense in today’s limping economy. Read more.

Take the Lowline. That’s the nickname for a proposed underground park that would be built in a former trolley terminal, unused since 1948, in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Designer James Ramsey discovered the space several years ago and immediately saw its potential for a kind of subterranean High Line—the popular park built on an abandoned rail trestle. Ramsey and his partner, Dan Barasch, presented their idea to a receptive Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which controls the space, but they realized they needed to build community support to take the project to the next level.

That’s where Kickstarter comes in. Earlier this year, Ramsey and Barasch created a Kickstarter campaign to raise $100,000, which would pay for a full-scale model of the park. Depending on the amount pledged, backers would receive T-shirts, tote bags, even a gourmet dinner prepared by Ramsey (three backers qualified for that perk).

“The response was overwhelming,” Ramsey says. “We hit our goal in eight days.” In fact, they raised $155,186, more than enough to pay for construction of a model, which went on display in a Manhattan warehouse for one week in September.

“Kickstarter was transformative for us,” Ramsey says. “It wasn’t just a way to raise money. It also functioned as a kind of marketing tool for a grassroots campaign.” Ramsey believes that crowd funding has the potential to be transform the way civic projects are financed. “Instead of one crotchety, crabby developer calling all the shots,” he says, “the client is thousands and thousands of people who care about the project. It’s much more democratic.”

Via: Architizer & massurban

Image: Matter Architecture Practice 

(via studio630)

Using Google Street View to See A City’s Personality – Next American City
No two cities are exactly the same, but some enjoy distinct looks that makes them unmistakable. Think of Parisian balconies with cast-iron banisters, chimneyed townhouses lining the streets of London, or the water towers and fire escapes of New York. Small quirks like these can add up to make a city instantly familiar to anyone in the world.
With this in mind, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have created a software programto determine exactly which features give certain cities their unique architectural character.
Using everyone’s favorite vicarious vacation dream machine, Google Street View, the researchers developed an algorithm that detects elements, such as a window, column or balcony, that are both distinct and occur with regularity inside a city. As explained in anaccompanying video, this disqualifies singular landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower, whose iron angles are distinct but don’t occur anywhere else in Paris. It also allows the program to ignore aspects like blank walls, which can be frequent but dull.

Using Google Street View to See A City’s Personality – Next American City

No two cities are exactly the same, but some enjoy distinct looks that makes them unmistakable. Think of Parisian balconies with cast-iron banisters, chimneyed townhouses lining the streets of London, or the water towers and fire escapes of New York. Small quirks like these can add up to make a city instantly familiar to anyone in the world.

With this in mind, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have created a software programto determine exactly which features give certain cities their unique architectural character.

Using everyone’s favorite vicarious vacation dream machine, Google Street View, the researchers developed an algorithm that detects elements, such as a window, column or balcony, that are both distinct and occur with regularity inside a city. As explained in anaccompanying video, this disqualifies singular landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower, whose iron angles are distinct but don’t occur anywhere else in Paris. It also allows the program to ignore aspects like blank walls, which can be frequent but dull.

Start Up Street - What will you start up?

I absolutely love the ambition of this! It’s a very commendable example of using local skills, knowledge and assets to make something bigger!

Architecture+Design Scotland have launched ‘Start Up Street” in Stirling (Scotland), in response to an ideas workshop attended by the members of the local community, business owners and the Council, to examine how to generate sustainable economic activity and employment opportunities locally in Stirling.  

The ‘start up street’ in Stirling is a local street that currently has 7 empty shops. They plan to use the underutilised assets to set up a hub to explore creative solutions that could stimulate and develop local enterprise and economic activity and deliver positive outcomes. To set the ball rolling the video also gives some great examples of various projects that could be launched that focus on health and well-being.

The High Street is a key element of our settlements. Its role as the central space of villages, towns and cities has been challenged by changes in the pattern of retail, of leisure, and living. In many High Streets in many settlements there are vacant and underutilised assets. In some cases the High Street is under pressure. It is an issue of concern for many, from businesses, to citizens, to investors.

Meeting the challenge of how to re-think the High Street as a central place requires creative thinking about how we make the best of what we already have. The communities in Stirling City Centre recently participated in a co-design exercise to re-think the centre of the City. The Urban Ideas Bakerybrought together citizens, officers of the Council, businesses and other stakeholders to look at how the people resources of the city and the spatial resources might be managed differently. Out of this thinking emerged an idea to re-consider King Street as a ‘start up street’, which enables business start ups, scaling of small business and curating events and activities in the public space. The proposal is to explore how people with ideas, talents and capabilities in the city can be matched with the available spaces in the city, supported by a community of interest. This idea is being tested in a prototype phase to engage a wide range of interests in exploring how the idea works, what is feasible, what is not. The objective is to use this practical method of testing the idea to develop a live project, to start small and build up a sustainable, self supporting enterprise.

The project is open to anyone with an interest in High Streets, how they work, and how they can be enhanced. This short video explains the thinking behind ‘Start Up Street’, whats involved and how you can get involved.

via irishboyinlondon:

 You Are Listening To | The Sounds of Cities 
youarelistening.to appeared online on March 6, 2011 and I was hooked instantly. The  combination of the police scanner and ambient music is an intriguing,  and distinctly live, experience (unlike most of the time shifted audio I  tend to consume). Its other appeal is its simple and elegant execution.  There are three component parts: a police radio stream from Radio Reference, a pre-screened ambient music playlist from SoundCloud, and a cool photo from Flickr.  Each element is from some other source, that never could have  envisioned that this is the way their content would be used. This is the  power of a shareable and mashable web.

You Are Listening To | The Sounds of Cities

youarelistening.to appeared online on March 6, 2011 and I was hooked instantly. The combination of the police scanner and ambient music is an intriguing, and distinctly live, experience (unlike most of the time shifted audio I tend to consume). Its other appeal is its simple and elegant execution. There are three component parts: a police radio stream from Radio Reference, a pre-screened ambient music playlist from SoundCloud, and a cool photo from Flickr. Each element is from some other source, that never could have envisioned that this is the way their content would be used. This is the power of a shareable and mashable web.