Making Smarter Cities By Making Smarter Systems | Co.Exist
A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.
The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.
The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.
By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.
What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.
People are Sensors
Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.
With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.

Making Smarter Cities By Making Smarter Systems | Co.Exist

A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.

The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.

The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.

By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.

What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.

People are Sensors

Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.

With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.

saveplanetearth:

Rising sea level a threat to East: Boston could feel especially strong impact, study says @ Boston Globe
Study: Warmer seas are rising faster and more along US East Coast than rest of the globe @ Washington Post
Scientists warn US east coast over accelerated sea level rise: Study says sea level is rising far faster than elsewhere, which could increase incidence of New York flooding @ Guardian

saveplanetearth:

Rising sea level a threat to East: Boston could feel especially strong impact, study says @ Boston Globe

Study: Warmer seas are rising faster and more along US East Coast than rest of the globe @ Washington Post

Scientists warn US east coast over accelerated sea level rise: Study says sea level is rising far faster than elsewhere, which could increase incidence of New York flooding @ Guardian

Join the Mobility Revolution with These Five Apps - Technology Review
Just in time: When’s the bus coming? NextBus takes  away the guesswork: the app tells you exactly how many minutes away your  bus is. It works using GPS signals from devices installed inside city  buses. Boston has signed on, and so has San Francisco, where the app  also keeps track of trolleys and cable cars.
NextBus is a 15-year-old company, and it was “tough going” for many  years, says chief technology officer Michael Smith. Originally, riders  got updates by calling a number or consulting bus-stop displays. Now the  rise of smart phones has made the system much more powerful. About 30  percent of NextBus’s 800,000 daily users access the app via iPhones or  other smart devices.
NextBus charges transit agencies a few hundred dollars per bus per  year to use its service, and more if the buses don’t have GPS yet. The  fee Los Angeles pays to use the software in its 2,500-vehicle fleet:  $1.5 million over three years. But that’s quickly made back in increased  ridership. Bus-stop haters can now arrive just in time.

Join the Mobility Revolution with These Five Apps - Technology Review

Just in time: When’s the bus coming? NextBus takes away the guesswork: the app tells you exactly how many minutes away your bus is. It works using GPS signals from devices installed inside city buses. Boston has signed on, and so has San Francisco, where the app also keeps track of trolleys and cable cars.

NextBus is a 15-year-old company, and it was “tough going” for many years, says chief technology officer Michael Smith. Originally, riders got updates by calling a number or consulting bus-stop displays. Now the rise of smart phones has made the system much more powerful. About 30 percent of NextBus’s 800,000 daily users access the app via iPhones or other smart devices.

NextBus charges transit agencies a few hundred dollars per bus per year to use its service, and more if the buses don’t have GPS yet. The fee Los Angeles pays to use the software in its 2,500-vehicle fleet: $1.5 million over three years. But that’s quickly made back in increased ridership. Bus-stop haters can now arrive just in time.