Cape Town Without The Freeways | Sustainable Cities Collective
Cape Town’s Foreshore freeway strangles the city and cuts it (and its people) off from the Port and water’s edge. With a comparison to San Francisco’s Embarcadero, Gareth Pearsonquestions what would happen if we did away with the Foreshore section of Nelson Mandela Boulevard altogether.
When Capetonians talk about the freeway along the Foreshore, there’s a good chance it involves a joke about the mysterious unfinished sections. It’s not the unfinished sections that I care about, it’s the entire thing.
The footprint of the freeway as well as the land in between each section is wasted, restricting the development of this lifeless area of the city. There have been a number of interventions proposed, as mentioned some time back in a post  by Andrew Boraine. More recently, the City of Cape Town, is proposing a 3 storey parking building to sit between the freeways, to support a new tower, as part of the Convention Centre expansion.
There is often talk of sinking the freeway below ground, a monstrous project not disimilar to Boston’s Big Dig. Sure, this is an option, as with any project it has its advantages and disadvantages. But what if the freeway was removed entirely? What if it was replaced with a tree-lined boulevard that accommodates public transport, bicycling, and walking?

Cape Town Without The Freeways | Sustainable Cities Collective

Cape Town’s Foreshore freeway strangles the city and cuts it (and its people) off from the Port and water’s edge. With a comparison to San Francisco’s Embarcadero, Gareth Pearsonquestions what would happen if we did away with the Foreshore section of Nelson Mandela Boulevard altogether.

When Capetonians talk about the freeway along the Foreshore, there’s a good chance it involves a joke about the mysterious unfinished sections. It’s not the unfinished sections that I care about, it’s the entire thing.

The footprint of the freeway as well as the land in between each section is wasted, restricting the development of this lifeless area of the city. There have been a number of interventions proposed, as mentioned some time back in a post  by Andrew Boraine. More recently, the City of Cape Town, is proposing a 3 storey parking building to sit between the freeways, to support a new tower, as part of the Convention Centre expansion.

There is often talk of sinking the freeway below ground, a monstrous project not disimilar to Boston’s Big Dig. Sure, this is an option, as with any project it has its advantages and disadvantages. But what if the freeway was removed entirely? What if it was replaced with a tree-lined boulevard that accommodates public transport, bicycling, and walking?

Are Green Buildings Truly Sustainable? | This Big City
With the built environment accounting for over 40% of global  carbon emissions, sustainable buildings seem like an obvious place to  start as COP17 continues to address climate change. But is the trend for  ‘green’ buildings resulting in truly sustainable alternatives? Mayra Hartmann of Future Cape Town investigates.
A few weeks ago the GBCSA hosted its annual conference.  The topics were plentiful and there was a certain buzz in the air.  Unfortunately, I was only able to attend the afternoon sessions, but  nonetheless I was able enjoy the whiff of green air. There was an  eclectic mix of developers, designers, planners and even psychologists  discussing an array of topics, however a few major developments and  ideas were presented. As someone that follows the industry, the ideas  were not brand new, but the fact that they were discussed in such close  proximity was cause for lively discussions.
The discussions and presentations concentrated on three aspects of building;
the building itself
the effect of green design on office inhabitants and;
its integration with its surroundings.
The design feature that seemed to be particularly popular was the use  of large central atriums to promote natural light and airflow within  the building, something South Africa’s two highest rated green star  buildings both make use of. Atriums are also effective at reviving old  spaces. Chris Jofeh from Arup described the companies “cut and carve”  approach when retrofitting old offices and that atriums were an ideal of  way opening up and lighting an otherwise dull space. And dull spaces  don’t make for a good working environment.

Are Green Buildings Truly Sustainable? | This Big City

With the built environment accounting for over 40% of global carbon emissions, sustainable buildings seem like an obvious place to start as COP17 continues to address climate change. But is the trend for ‘green’ buildings resulting in truly sustainable alternatives? Mayra Hartmann of Future Cape Town investigates.

A few weeks ago the GBCSA hosted its annual conference. The topics were plentiful and there was a certain buzz in the air. Unfortunately, I was only able to attend the afternoon sessions, but nonetheless I was able enjoy the whiff of green air. There was an eclectic mix of developers, designers, planners and even psychologists discussing an array of topics, however a few major developments and ideas were presented. As someone that follows the industry, the ideas were not brand new, but the fact that they were discussed in such close proximity was cause for lively discussions.

The discussions and presentations concentrated on three aspects of building;

  1. the building itself
  2. the effect of green design on office inhabitants and;
  3. its integration with its surroundings.

The design feature that seemed to be particularly popular was the use of large central atriums to promote natural light and airflow within the building, something South Africa’s two highest rated green star buildings both make use of. Atriums are also effective at reviving old spaces. Chris Jofeh from Arup described the companies “cut and carve” approach when retrofitting old offices and that atriums were an ideal of way opening up and lighting an otherwise dull space. And dull spaces don’t make for a good working environment.

How do we Create Urban Spaces for Millions of People? | This Big City

The secret is out – everywhere you look cities are mushrooming, and people go flocking. A flock of people migrating to cities quickly creates more than just crowds, it creates Overcrowds. These Overcrowds breath, eat, sleep, work, play and most of all move. People move from home to work to gym to school to a restaurant to home, and tomorrow it starts all over again (granted these patterns can be vastly different).
How are Overcrowds and congestion related? In its most basic definition, congestion is the overcrowding of a particular space. So, how does one as a planner, architect or engineer create the streams for this flow of crowds to move, or even live, freely?
Anyone that has lived in a city has been witness (or even a member) of these Overcrowds. They’re on your streets, public transport (armpits in face anyone), and your treadmill; they’re in your grocers, schools, and hospitals. They follow you to work in the mornings and leave you at home in the afternoons. Often the Others will tell us city dwellers: “You chose to share ‘your’ space with millions of people. Deal with it!” I say: “N-to-the-O”, and this refusal is the great challenge of our city dwelling generation.
So, how do we create urban spaces, for millions of people, without getting into each other’s spaces?
My answer: be smart about it. Simple right?! Well, not quite. No solution to an infinitely complex problem will be simple, however the approach you take, and the perspective you employ to solve that problem can be smart and simple.
Congestion, although being a problem, is not a cause, it is a symptom. Therefore, in order to cure our cities of congestion, you must rid them of the virus that caused it. That virus is a lack of alternatives within the various systems that make up a city (whether be it transport, retail or education) and little diversity and experimentation in professionals, and “experts”, attempts’ to provide these systems. So, much like when you have a flu, you don’t attempt to cure it simply by blowing your nose, i.e. getting rid of congestion, you rid your body of the influenza virus.

How do we Create Urban Spaces for Millions of People? | This Big City

The secret is out – everywhere you look cities are mushrooming, and people go flocking. A flock of people migrating to cities quickly creates more than just crowds, it creates Overcrowds. These Overcrowds breath, eat, sleep, work, play and most of all move. People move from home to work to gym to school to a restaurant to home, and tomorrow it starts all over again (granted these patterns can be vastly different).

How are Overcrowds and congestion related? In its most basic definition, congestion is the overcrowding of a particular space. So, how does one as a planner, architect or engineer create the streams for this flow of crowds to move, or even live, freely?

Anyone that has lived in a city has been witness (or even a member) of these Overcrowds. They’re on your streets, public transport (armpits in face anyone), and your treadmill; they’re in your grocers, schools, and hospitals. They follow you to work in the mornings and leave you at home in the afternoons. Often the Others will tell us city dwellers: “You chose to share ‘your’ space with millions of people. Deal with it!” I say: “N-to-the-O”, and this refusal is the great challenge of our city dwelling generation.

So, how do we create urban spaces, for millions of people, without getting into each other’s spaces?

My answer: be smart about it. Simple right?! Well, not quite. No solution to an infinitely complex problem will be simple, however the approach you take, and the perspective you employ to solve that problem can be smart and simple.

Congestion, although being a problem, is not a cause, it is a symptom. Therefore, in order to cure our cities of congestion, you must rid them of the virus that caused it. That virus is a lack of alternatives within the various systems that make up a city (whether be it transport, retail or education) and little diversity and experimentation in professionals, and “experts”, attempts’ to provide these systems. So, much like when you have a flu, you don’t attempt to cure it simply by blowing your nose, i.e. getting rid of congestion, you rid your body of the influenza virus.

Hub Culture -  Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Hub Culture Zeitgeist Ranking is a city ranking produced annually since 2007. The most recent rankings were released in January 2010:
1. São Paulo 2009 Rank 7
2. Berlin 2009 Rank 2
3. San Francisco  2008 Rank: 12
4. Los Angeles 2009 Rank: 3
5. Shanghai 2009 Rank: 10
6. Zürich (New)
7. Sydney 2009 Rank: 5
8. New York 2009 Rank: 9
9. London 2009 Rank: 10
10. Hong Kong 2009 Rank: 8
11. Beijing 2009 Rank: 3
12. Washington DC 2009 Rank: 1
13. Cape Town (New)
14. Singapore 2009 Rank: 14
15. Tokyo 2009 Rank: 5
16. Copenhagen 2009 Rank: 20
17. Mexico D.F. 2009 Rank 19
18. Istanbul 2009 Rank: 18
19. Buenos Aires 2009 Rank: 14
20. Abu Dhabi (New)

Hub Culture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Hub Culture Zeitgeist Ranking is a city ranking produced annually since 2007. The most recent rankings were released in January 2010:

1. São Paulo 2009 Rank 7

2. Berlin 2009 Rank 2

3. San Francisco  2008 Rank: 12

4. Los Angeles 2009 Rank: 3

5. Shanghai 2009 Rank: 10

6. Zürich (New)

7. Sydney 2009 Rank: 5

8. New York 2009 Rank: 9

9. London 2009 Rank: 10

10. Hong Kong 2009 Rank: 8

11. Beijing 2009 Rank: 3

12. Washington DC 2009 Rank: 1

13. Cape Town (New)

14. Singapore 2009 Rank: 14

15. Tokyo 2009 Rank: 5

16. Copenhagen 2009 Rank: 20

17. Mexico D.F. 2009 Rank 19

18. Istanbul 2009 Rank: 18

19. Buenos Aires 2009 Rank: 14

20. Abu Dhabi (New)