The success of London’s congestion charge, in three maps

In its first few years, the London charging scheme was heralded as a solid traffic-buster, with 15-20 percent boosts in auto and bus speeds and 30 percent reductions in congestion delays. Most of those gains appear to have disappeared in recent years, however. Transport for London (TfL), which combines the functions of our NYCDOT and MTA and which created and operates the charging system, attributes the fallback in speeds to other changes in the streetscape and traffic management …

Car Traffic Declines

Bicycle Usage Rises

Public Transit Use Increases

Public Transportation … for Your Car? | Atlantic Cities
Anwar Farooq has patented an eyebrow-raising invention. A train-ferry for car commuters. This kind of system would certainly eliminate traffic congestion in our highways. This rapid commute system would enable long-distance car commuters to hop aboard a train instead – while still bringing their personal vehicles with them.

Public Transportation … for Your Car? | Atlantic Cities

Anwar Farooq has patented an eyebrow-raising invention. A train-ferry for car commuters. This kind of system would certainly eliminate traffic congestion in our highways. This rapid commute system would enable long-distance car commuters to hop aboard a train instead – while still bringing their personal vehicles with them.

For a city to offer smart services and save money, its departments have to work closely together, share their data and use a common IT infrastructure. London, for instance, has different payment systems for public transport, bicycle hire and toll roads. Such fragmentation is costly and makes it more difficult to come up with new offers (say, reducing the congestion charge for those who often hire a bicycle). But getting a city’s islands of bureaucracy to work together tends to be difficult, says Mark Cleverley of IBM, who helps governments and cities develop plans for smart systems. The problem is not just that departments often jealously protect their data, something experts call TEP, as in “turf, ego and power”. Officials also lack a common language or generally agreed criteria for a smart city—which is a big issue, too, for the many companies that are usually involved in a project. “It’s hard to build a business case if people don’t understand each other,” says Simon Giles, in charge of strategy for smart technologies at Accenture. Things are easier in Singapore. Ministries and agencies compete for reputation and resources, but they also co-operate closely on implementing master plans such as “A Lively and Liveable Singapore: Strategies for Sustainable Growth”, the city-state’s roadmap to becoming smart. That helps to explain why Singapore will probably be the first city to combine its various smart systems into a single one.

smarterplanet:

Smarter Leaders vPanel: Social Computing & Urban Traffic on IBM Global Business Services: The Video Studio

Catch the on demand replay of our latest webcam-based dialogue. The focus of this vPanel: the challenge of urban traffic and how human behavior and social media can help remedy it.  

Panelists:

  • Shaun Abrahamson, Founder and CEO, Mutopo
  • Naveen Lamba, Industry Leader, Smart Transportation, IBM
  • Sarah Goodyear, Cities Editor, Grist.org
  • Richard MacManus, Founder of ReadWriteWeb

smarterplanet:

IBM Commercial Data Transportation: Data Analysis Makes For Efficient Transportation Solutions

http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/e… Harnessing real-time transportation data can help cut commute times and reduce carbon emissions. See how IBM is helping to build smarter transportation systems in places like Singapore and Stockholm.

This is data. Data generated by people moving through a city. People in cars on trains, on buses. When you can see data as it happens, it can help cut commute times by 50%, reduce carbon emissions by 14%. On a smarter planet, we can capture, analyze and use data in new ways to do what theyre doing in places like Singapore and Stockholm and build a smarter transportation system.