IBM team helping Providence improve building-permit process | The Providence Journal

In this city celebrating its 375th anniversary, the process of getting a building permit has become complicated over the centuries, involving multiple offices and multiple approvals.

“Cities are struggling with how to streamline this process,” says Tracy J. McNairn, an IBM employee who is part of a company team that has descended on Providence for three weeks to help the city make one part of its bureaucracy run better.

McNairn adds that a Google search turned up about a million hits related to cities trying to improve their own processes for handling building permits. Plus, she says, “they’re all under financial constraints and pressures and always looking to save money.”

The IBM team wants to make sure that people seeking building permits don’t need to walk in one door to get one piece of a project done only to walk in and out of many other doors before taking care of all the necessary steps, says Cathleen Finn, IBM’s New England manager for corporate citizenship and affairs.

Today, municipalities and citizens more than ever need to understand their patterns of behavior and how to change them. Whether it is in water consumption, traffic patterns or energy use, they need new technologies to enable the change. Our sustainability initiatives in Dubuque prove that, by using advanced analytics, community engagement, and cloud computing, government officials and citizens will have access to real-time data to alter their patterns of behavior, which will save them money. This water sustainability pilot case is a template for communities worldwide that seek to conserve various types of resources.

Quote by Milind Naphade, program director, smarter city services, IBM Research.  Quote found at "Dubuque, Iowa and IBM Combine Analytics, Cloud Computing and Community Engagement to Conserve Water"
The power of analytics for public sector: Building analytics competency to accelerate outcomes 
Complex societal, economic, political and environmental pressures are  placing intense demands on public sector organizations to make smarter  decisions, deliver results and demonstrate accountability.
An unprecedented “information explosion” both facilitates and  complicates the ability of governments and institutions to achieve and  influence desirable outcomes. A tremendous opportunity exists to use the  growing mountain of data to make better fact-based decisions. Yet, the  volume of data and its increasingly diverse and interactive nature can  also paralyze organizations as they try to separate the noteworthy from  the not-worthy.
Download the executive summary (786KB)
Register to download the complete IBM Institute for Business Value executive report 
via smarterplanet:

The power of analytics for public sector: Building analytics competency to accelerate outcomes

Complex societal, economic, political and environmental pressures are placing intense demands on public sector organizations to make smarter decisions, deliver results and demonstrate accountability.

An unprecedented “information explosion” both facilitates and complicates the ability of governments and institutions to achieve and influence desirable outcomes. A tremendous opportunity exists to use the growing mountain of data to make better fact-based decisions. Yet, the volume of data and its increasingly diverse and interactive nature can also paralyze organizations as they try to separate the noteworthy from the not-worthy.

via smarterplanet:

What’s one major consequence of a city becoming a booming economic center? Increased traffic that leads to mind-numbing, stop-and-go commutes. IBM surveyed drivers in 20 of the world’s metropolises to see which city’s drivers experienced most traffic-related woes. Its Commuter Pain Index takes into account factors such as time drivers spent stuck in traffic, high gas prices, stress and anger caused by long commutes, and even instances where the specter of a bumper-to-bumper drive pushes drivers to cancel trips. Check out the results here.

A Smart Transportation System: Improving Mobility for the 21st Century

What if a city could optimize around its citizens? Cities typically operate with different networks, infrastructures and systems for services such as transportation, communication, water and energy. Only when these networks are effective and efficient can cities serve their population successfully. Cities can use technology to help these systems become more instrumented, interconnected, and intelligent. With these improvements, cities can work smarter to seize opportunities and build sustainable prosperity.

Quote by Nancy Pearson, vice president of IBM Business Process Management, SOA and WebSphere Marketing. Quote found at IBM Impact Blog

Cityone Picture

(via horizonwatching)

(via horizonwatching)