MIT maps PV potential for Cambridge, MA | Green Futures Magazine
A new 3D map covering 17,000 rooftops in Cambridge, Massachusetts, means communities can estimate the benefits of installing photovoltaic panels on a particular building at a glance. The Mapdwell Project, developed by MIT’s Sustainable Design Lab, combines Google satellite imagery with light detection and ranging data. It improves on previous models by taking account of roof shapes, physical obstructions and weather conditions offering a more accurate calculation of potential hourly solar energy production.

MIT maps PV potential for Cambridge, MA | Green Futures Magazine

A new 3D map covering 17,000 rooftops in Cambridge, Massachusetts, means communities can estimate the benefits of installing photovoltaic panels on a particular building at a glance. The Mapdwell Project, developed by MIT’s Sustainable Design Lab, combines Google satellite imagery with light detection and ranging data. It improves on previous models by taking account of roof shapes, physical obstructions and weather conditions offering a more accurate calculation of potential hourly solar energy production.

MIT students develop 3D-printed ‘Sesame Ring’ to replace public transit cards | 3ders
It is very convenient to take public transportation in big cities, but sometimes it is annoying and time consuming fishing through your purse for your transit card.
Two undergraduate students at MIT has created the 3D-printed “Sesame Ring” to replace Boston’s transit card, the Charlie Card, after they became frustrated at constantly losing their passes at the bottom of their bags.

MIT students develop 3D-printed ‘Sesame Ring’ to replace public transit cards | 3ders

It is very convenient to take public transportation in big cities, but sometimes it is annoying and time consuming fishing through your purse for your transit card.

Two undergraduate students at MIT has created the 3D-printed “Sesame Ring” to replace Boston’s transit card, the Charlie Card, after they became frustrated at constantly losing their passes at the bottom of their bags.

We take the particular perspective that cities are systems of systems, and that there are emerging opportunities to introduce digital nervous systems, intelligent responsiveness, and optimization at every level of system integration – from that of individual devices and appliances to that of buildings, and ultimately to that of complete cities and urban regions.

annaovchinnikova:

REAL TIME ROME

Real Time Rome is a great project example, personally a really like it’s show a clever and intelligent part of technology for to improve a life and recheck correct use of our now a day resources.This progect the MIT SENSEable City Lab’s contribution to the 2006 Venice Biennale, directed by professor Richard Burdett. The project aggregated data from cell phones (obtained using Telecom Italia’s innovative Lochness platform), buses and taxis in Rome to better understand urban dynamics in real time. By revealing the pulse of the city, the project aims to show how technology can help individuals make more informed decisions about their environment. In the long run, will it be possible to reduce the inefficiencies of present day urban systems and open the way to a more sustainable urban future?

In today’s world, wireless mobile communications devices are creating new dimensions of interconnectedness between people, places, and urban infrastructure. This ubiquitous connectivity within the urban population can be observed and interpreted in real-time, through aggregate records collected from communication networks. Real-time visualizations expose the dynamics of the contemporary city as urban systems coalesce: traces of information and communication networks, movement patterns of people and transportation systems, spatial and social usage of streets and neighborhoods. Observing the real-time city becomes a means to understanding the present and anticipating the future of urban environments. In the visualizations of Real Time Rome we synthesize data from various real-time networks to understand patterns of daily life in Rome.

MIT  SENSEable City Lab
The real-time city is now real! The increasing deployment of sensors and hand-held electronics in recent years is allowing a new approach to the study of the built environment. The way we describe and understand cities is being radically transformed - alongside the tools we use to design them and impact on their physical structure. Studying these changes from a critical point of view and anticipating them is the goal of the SENSEable City Laboratory, a new research initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

MIT SENSEable City Lab

The real-time city is now real! The increasing deployment of sensors and hand-held electronics in recent years is allowing a new approach to the study of the built environment. The way we describe and understand cities is being radically transformed - alongside the tools we use to design them and impact on their physical structure. Studying these changes from a critical point of view and anticipating them is the goal of the SENSEable City Laboratory, a new research initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

gangurru:

Technology Review: A Better Solar Collector

Looking to make solar panels cheaper, MIT researchers have created sheets of glass coated with advanced organic dyes that more efficiently concentrate sunlight. The researchers, whose results appear in this week’s issue of Science, say that the coated glass sheets could eventually make solar power as cheap as electricity from fossil fuels.

gangurru:

Technology Review: A Better Solar Collector

Looking to make solar panels cheaper, MIT researchers have created sheets of glass coated with advanced organic dyes that more efficiently concentrate sunlight. The researchers, whose results appear in this week’s issue of Science, say that the coated glass sheets could eventually make solar power as cheap as electricity from fossil fuels.