Smarter Government for a Smarter Planet - IBM Pulse conference community blog

Why Pulse 2012 for Smarter Government?


Governments are facing increased challenges from budget constraints and lack of resources while service to citizens becomes more demanding. Pulse 2012 will explore these issues and more, to help attendees learn how to optimize government infrastructure and deliver ultimate business value to citizens.

Pulse 2012  attendees will hear from diverse clients like City of Cambridge, Boston College, Tulane University, City of Dubuque and NC State University who will discuss today’s government challenges, on topics ranging from leadership and innovation in smarter cities, to managing assets in a regulatory environment and moving to the Cloud to achieve significant benefits.

Pulse 2012  will also be featuring the newest technology initiatives and next-generation solutions offered by IBM and our business partners, including:
  • IBM Solutions for Smarter Cities demonstration which will show how IBM’s solutions can help improve city operations and incident response, reduce crime and traffic congestion, increase worker productivity and reduce water consumption.
  • IBM’s Smarter Buildings demonstration which focuses on IBM Intelligent Building Management. The solution provides key analytics through a consolidated, role-based view of data in two key areas — energy and facilities management — helping building owners, operators and managers increase building management effectiveness and energy efficiency, with lower operating costs.
  • IBM TRIRIGA Facilities Management solution is a visual interface to manage space used by enterprises to identify under-utilized facilities, increase space utilization and streamline move management.
  • IBM TRIRIGA Lease Accounting for Assets and Facilities which delivers advanced analytics and financial controls to accelerate preparedness and compliance for the new lease accounting standards.
Small Cities Feed the Knowledge Economy | Wired.com
Case Study: Omaha, Nebraska
It’s only the 42nd-largest city in the US, but over the past two  decades, Omaha has been transformed into one of the Midwest’s most  vibrant cultural hubs. Here’s how the rebirth happened, starting in the  ’90s.

Small Cities Feed the Knowledge Economy | Wired.com

Case Study: Omaha, Nebraska

It’s only the 42nd-largest city in the US, but over the past two decades, Omaha has been transformed into one of the Midwest’s most vibrant cultural hubs. Here’s how the rebirth happened, starting in the ’90s.

Learn about the new ways in which federal and municipal stakeholders are collaborating to promote the economic, physical, and social development of small- to mid-sized cities. Speakers will share their knowledge about successful strategies for economic and social development and discuss opportunities and challenges faced by their growing cities in these difficult economic times.

Conference topics will include economic development, the creative economy, sustainability, transportation, housing, education, etc. The conference will provide a forum for dialogue on these issues and offer participants a chance to contribute their thoughts toward concrete policy proposals. This is an opportunity to help shape an effective strategy for urban America.

Speakers from six cities will present best practices in use at each of their own municipalities:

  • Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • Asheville, North Carolina
  • Belfast, Northern Ireland
  • Lowell, Massachusetts
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Portland, Oregon

datavis:

Best Small Cities to Buy A House

City of Worcester, MA (USA)

Not long ago, I came across a link, which allowed me to report a pothole requiring repair, to the Dept. of Public Works in my city.  We had to email back and forth a couple of times, to clarity the location of the needed repair, but it was repaired as a result.  I think all cities should have web sites, where citizens can write in regarding issues, which need to be addressed.  There are several benefits: the requests are easily documented, can be read at a convenient time, can be submitted at convenient times and can be monitored for resolution.  I think this is one way, that cities can attempt to be more efficient, without incurring additional costs.