Sheltering A City With Data: The Rio de Janeiro Story (by IBM)

Rio de Janeiro, the most visited city in the southern hemisphere, will soon play host to both the World Cup and the Olympic Games. Unfortunately it is also the location of the biggest natural disaster in Brazil’s history. In 2010, Rio de Janeiro was devastated by severe floods and mudslides, which took hundreds of lives and left thousands homeless.

Out of the need for improved emergency management and better weather prediction, IBM helped the city integrate predictive analytics, real-time data, and weather modeling technology and establish a state-of-the-art operations center. At the heart of the center is PMAR, a high resolution weather prediction system powered by IBM’s Deep Thunder supercomputer. It lets the city predict rains and floods 48 hours in advance, allowing for better management of emergency services and potentially saving lives.

From there the Rio Operations Center grew, and now acts as a nervous system for the entire city: managing traffic congestion, keeping a close eye on crime response and prevention, predicting brownouts in the power grid, and coordinating large-scale events to ensure public safety.

Integrating over 30 agencies and services across the city, the Rio Operations Center empowers the government and its citizens to be prepared for whatever nature may throw their way. IBM is helping make cities smarter. Let’s build a smarter planet -

Rio de Janeiro 2011

The future of our planet depends on our cities. By 2050, that’s where seventy percent of the Earth’s population will be living—growing from 3.3 billion people today to a breathtaking 6.4 billion. This wave of urbanization presents enormous challenges and opportunities to all of us—but especially to city leaders, and especially now as broad consensus for change emerges, driven by economic necessity and environmental concern.

The good news is that we now have the capability—both technological and political—to transform our cities for greater sustainability, growth and social progress. We now possess new tools and models to make cities more productive, more efficient, more vibrant and more responsive—in a word, smarter.

Hosted by IBM Chairman, President and CEO Samuel J. Palmisano, this leadership forum will bring together senior government and business leaders from Latin America’s most progressive cities to examine how we can spur economic development, modernize infrastructures and transform our cities to create a new urban model.

At our SmarterCities forum, we will convene experts from around the world to discuss the opportunities and challenges associated with urbanization and globalization. We will explore new approaches to regional partnership, identify roadblocks, evaluate frameworks for investment and review the tools that are helping our cities meet 21st century realities.

ibmsocialbiz:

A team of IBMers and Social Media Week are working together on a kind of grassroots, crowdsourced research. Share your views on Social Commerce and help us scan and analyze the collective intelligence of the Social Media Week global community.
Answer Today’s Social Commerce Scan | Question 2. Global/Local:
What  would make commerce smarter via social media in Beirut? Berlin? Bogota?  Buenos Aires? Chicago? Glasgow? Tell us what it means for you in your  Social Media Week city: Los Angeles, Milan, Moscow, Rio, Sao Paulo or  Vancouver.

About the Scan

ibmsocialbiz:

A team of IBMers and Social Media Week are working together on a kind of grassroots, crowdsourced research. Share your views on Social Commerce and help us scan and analyze the collective intelligence of the Social Media Week global community.

Answer Today’s Social Commerce Scan | Question 2. Global/Local:



What would make commerce smarter via social media in Beirut? Berlin? Bogota? Buenos Aires? Chicago? Glasgow? Tell us what it means for you in your Social Media Week city: Los Angeles, Milan, Moscow, Rio, Sao Paulo or Vancouver.


About the Scan

How Data is Making Rio de Janeiro a Smarter City - TNW Latin America
Do you plan to attend 2014 FIFA World Cup or 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro? If so, the city is already getting ready to welcome  you. Here is how Rio is using technology and data management to get  smarter.
Manage information to avoid tragedies
In April 2010, the State of Rio de Janeiro was hit by a natural disaster, when floods and mudslides killed over 200 people and made 15,000 homeless. Worse, Rio de Janeiro’s Mayor admitted that Rio’s preparedness was “less than zero”. To avoid similar  tragedies, the city had until the next rainy season to prepare. This led  to the creation of Rio Operations Center in partnership with IBM. It opened its doors on December 31st 2010, only a few months after the catastrophe.
Rio Operations Center, the city’s control room
Although its initial focus was floods, the scope of Rio Operations  Center expanded considerably. Beyond managing all emergency response  situations, it’s also the city’s information management center. It  monitors transportation, water, weather and energy 24/7, 365 days a  year.
The Center is part of the Smarter Cities initiative that IBM has been promoting since 2007. The group, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in June, has  launched similar projects in cities such as New York City or Gauteng in  South Africa. However, Rio is its most ambitious initiative to date, as  part of the major transformations the city is going through ahead of the World Cup and Olympics.

How Data is Making Rio de Janeiro a Smarter City - TNW Latin America

Do you plan to attend 2014 FIFA World Cup or 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro? If so, the city is already getting ready to welcome you. Here is how Rio is using technology and data management to get smarter.

Manage information to avoid tragedies

In April 2010, the State of Rio de Janeiro was hit by a natural disaster, when floods and mudslides killed over 200 people and made 15,000 homeless. Worse, Rio de Janeiro’s Mayor admitted that Rio’s preparedness was “less than zero”. To avoid similar tragedies, the city had until the next rainy season to prepare. This led to the creation of Rio Operations Center in partnership with IBM. It opened its doors on December 31st 2010, only a few months after the catastrophe.

Rio Operations Center, the city’s control room

Although its initial focus was floods, the scope of Rio Operations Center expanded considerably. Beyond managing all emergency response situations, it’s also the city’s information management center. It monitors transportation, water, weather and energy 24/7, 365 days a year.

The Center is part of the Smarter Cities initiative that IBM has been promoting since 2007. The group, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in June, has launched similar projects in cities such as New York City or Gauteng in South Africa. However, Rio is its most ambitious initiative to date, as part of the major transformations the city is going through ahead of the World Cup and Olympics.