How To Prevent Hunger In Upcoming Decades? Try Precision Agriculture | HuffPost Tech
How many mouths will the world be feeding by 2050? It is an estimated 9.2 billion, up from 7 billion today. To keep pace with this growing population, global food production will need to increase by 70 percent.
That means getting a lot smarter about how we raise crops. With 38 percent of the world’s land already dedicated to agricultural production, our existing infrastructure has the potential to meet these demands.

How To Prevent Hunger In Upcoming Decades? Try Precision Agriculture | HuffPost Tech

How many mouths will the world be feeding by 2050? It is an estimated 9.2 billion, up from 7 billion today. To keep pace with this growing population, global food production will need to increase by 70 percent.

That means getting a lot smarter about how we raise crops. With 38 percent of the world’s land already dedicated to agricultural production, our existing infrastructure has the potential to meet these demands.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel aims to encourage urban agriculture - chicagotribune.com
Urban farmers were delighted Tuesday when Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced a proposed ordinance that could make growing and selling fresh produce in Chicago much easier. In December, some of the biggest local names in urban agriculture had protested a previous proposal that they felt would stunt the growth of city gardens with cumbersome rules on plot size, high-end fencing and produce sales in residential areas. Erika Allen, head of seven nonprofit Growing Power farms in Chicago, predicted at the time that her group’s work “would be over” if the zoning ordinance passed. But Tuesday morning, Emanuel chose Allen’s new Iron Street Farm in Bridgeport to present his proposed ordinance — one that marks a turnaround on almost every thorny issue in the last proposal. “We’ve been working really hard to see this happen,” said Allen, who served on the mayor’s transition team. “I think it’s just a new administration and a changing of the guard. Former Mayor (Richard) Daley was supportive, but there was a lot of opposition coming out of (the zoning department) that was very much entrenched in ‘this is the way it we do it.’”

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel aims to encourage urban agriculture - chicagotribune.com

Urban farmers were delighted Tuesday when Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced a proposed ordinance that could make growing and selling fresh produce in Chicago much easier.

In December, some of the biggest local names in urban agriculture had protested a previous proposal that they felt would stunt the growth of city gardens with cumbersome rules on plot size, high-end fencing and produce sales in residential areas.

Erika Allen, head of seven nonprofit Growing Power farms in Chicago, predicted at the time that her group’s work “would be over” if the zoning ordinance passed.

But Tuesday morning, Emanuel chose Allen’s new Iron Street Farm in Bridgeport to present his proposed ordinance — one that marks a turnaround on almost every thorny issue in the last proposal.

“We’ve been working really hard to see this happen,” said Allen, who served on the mayor’s transition team. “I think it’s just a new administration and a changing of the guard. Former Mayor (Richard) Daley was supportive, but there was a lot of opposition coming out of (the zoning department) that was very much entrenched in ‘this is the way it we do it.’”

 Coming soon, to a city near you: open-source agriculture | Grist
Most people attempting to build a viable urban agriculture business  are acutely aware of the enormously challenging and time-consuming  process of navigating zoning regulations. Having worked in this sector, I  can personally testify that the process is tedious and  time-sucking. Over the past couple of years, a number of cities such as  New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Chicago have begun enacting,  or at the very least exploring, new regulations. One of the major  challenges facing policymakers, however, is identifying effective  policies and best practices.
Which is why I got excited when I learned about Washington, D.C.-based John Reinhardt and the urban agriculture zoning and food sovereignty ordinance maps recently launched on his blog Grown in the City. Among  other things covered, Reinhardt and his cousin Bob Wall are using  technology to help people understand urban agriculture and food  sovereignty policy approaches across the United States. Grown in The  City’s new iTools column focuses  on educating urban agriculturists of all kinds on how they can use open  source technology to better communicate food policy and urban planning  data, reviews tools, and highlights other resourceful websites.
My interview with Reinhardt gives insight into the maps, why  open-source data is crucial for optimizing policy decision-making, and  the food and tech trends that he’s most excited about.
John Reinhardt.Q. How did an urban planner get interested in food and tech?

 Coming soon, to a city near you: open-source agriculture | Grist

Most people attempting to build a viable urban agriculture business are acutely aware of the enormously challenging and time-consuming process of navigating zoning regulations. Having worked in this sector, I can personally testify that the process is tedious and time-sucking. Over the past couple of years, a number of cities such as New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Chicago have begun enacting, or at the very least exploring, new regulations. One of the major challenges facing policymakers, however, is identifying effective policies and best practices.

Which is why I got excited when I learned about Washington, D.C.-based John Reinhardt and the urban agriculture zoning and food sovereignty ordinance maps recently launched on his blog Grown in the City. Among other things covered, Reinhardt and his cousin Bob Wall are using technology to help people understand urban agriculture and food sovereignty policy approaches across the United States. Grown in The City’s new iTools column focuses on educating urban agriculturists of all kinds on how they can use open source technology to better communicate food policy and urban planning data, reviews tools, and highlights other resourceful websites.

My interview with Reinhardt gives insight into the maps, why open-source data is crucial for optimizing policy decision-making, and the food and tech trends that he’s most excited about.

John Reinhardt.John Reinhardt.Q. How did an urban planner get interested in food and tech?

trendd:

Vertical Farms
I am sure that you can tell by now that I have been going through my environmental/architecture blogs on the reader, but I also love the idea of vertical farming in urban environments.
This article goes through the problem and the theory behind vertical farms.
Inhabitat » Smarter Cities: Vertical Farming Could Ease World’s Agricultural Woes

trendd:

Vertical Farms

I am sure that you can tell by now that I have been going through my environmental/architecture blogs on the reader, but I also love the idea of vertical farming in urban environments.

This article goes through the problem and the theory behind vertical farms.

Inhabitat » Smarter Cities: Vertical Farming Could Ease World’s Agricultural Woes