When commuting in Mumbai, bring your smartphone | TheCityFix
Carpooling is not a new idea. In order to save money, reduce congestion, or simply use a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane, friends and neighbors have been sharing rides for a long time.
For a country like India, which is expected to become the most populous country in the world by 2025, and for which the number of cars on the road grows every year, solutions like car sharing can’t come too soon. As smartphone penetration increases across India, the solution to gridlocked traffic may lie in apps and other new technologies.
Metershare, a new app developed by students in Mumbai, India, takes ridesharing to the next level, encouraging strangers going the same direction to meet up in order to share a taxi or an auto-rickshaw. By encouraging users to share something other than a personal car, the app offers a solution to Mumbai’s congested streets.

When commuting in Mumbai, bring your smartphone | TheCityFix

Carpooling is not a new idea. In order to save money, reduce congestion, or simply use a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane, friends and neighbors have been sharing rides for a long time.

For a country like India, which is expected to become the most populous country in the world by 2025, and for which the number of cars on the road grows every year, solutions like car sharing can’t come too soon. As smartphone penetration increases across India, the solution to gridlocked traffic may lie in apps and other new technologies.

Metershare, a new app developed by students in Mumbai, India, takes ridesharing to the next level, encouraging strangers going the same direction to meet up in order to share a taxi or an auto-rickshaw. By encouraging users to share something other than a personal car, the app offers a solution to Mumbai’s congested streets.

An App that Sees and Prevents Future Traffic Jams - Technology - GOOD
Anyone’s smartphone can caculate the shortest distance between two places and even recommend a route to avoid traffic along the way. But what about an app that helps prevent traffic jams before they begin? That’s the premise of Greenway, a new program for Windows Phone that plugs its users’ locations, destinations, and speeds into an algorithm to figure out where and when traffic jams are likely to occur. Then, it provides a route to steer cars away from those roads. The route is called, appopriately, the “Greenway,” and it’s optimized for traffic, time, and the amount of gas used based on data about where other drivers are headed at the same time.
As cofounder Christian Brüggemann told Technology Review, the app factors in data about a street, like the number of lanes and speed limit, to calculate the maximum number of vehicles it can handle before bottlenecks. Then the app redirects cars from busy streets so they don’t tip past their carrying capacity. A Greenway user’s phone will send updates to Greenway almost constantly so the app can redirect on-the-fly if its led a driver into a jam.
So far, the approach seems to be working. In a computer simulation of 50,000 cars, Greenway  users show up at their destinations twice as fast as non-users. And they only burn up one fifth of the fuel. In Munich, a pilot group of a few dozen drivers is trying it out in real life.

An App that Sees and Prevents Future Traffic Jams - Technology - GOOD

Anyone’s smartphone can caculate the shortest distance between two places and even recommend a route to avoid traffic along the way. But what about an app that helps prevent traffic jams before they begin? That’s the premise of Greenway, a new program for Windows Phone that plugs its users’ locations, destinations, and speeds into an algorithm to figure out where and when traffic jams are likely to occur. Then, it provides a route to steer cars away from those roads. The route is called, appopriately, the “Greenway,” and it’s optimized for traffic, time, and the amount of gas used based on data about where other drivers are headed at the same time.

As cofounder Christian Brüggemann told Technology Review, the app factors in data about a street, like the number of lanes and speed limit, to calculate the maximum number of vehicles it can handle before bottlenecks. Then the app redirects cars from busy streets so they don’t tip past their carrying capacity. A Greenway user’s phone will send updates to Greenway almost constantly so the app can redirect on-the-fly if its led a driver into a jam.

So far, the approach seems to be working. In a computer simulation of 50,000 cars, Greenway  users show up at their destinations twice as fast as non-users. And they only burn up one fifth of the fuel. In Munich, a pilot group of a few dozen drivers is trying it out in real life.

springwise:

App offers stranded passengers stories based on delay time
Public transport users in Brazil looking for entertainment while they travel have already been offered 24×7 Cultural’s pay-what-you-want book vending machines located in subway stations. For travelers who weren’t planning on taking a lengthy journey however, the Netherland’s VertragingsApp now offers stories organized by the time it takes to read them for those stuck on a delayed service. READ MORE…

springwise:

App offers stranded passengers stories based on delay time

Public transport users in Brazil looking for entertainment while they travel have already been offered 24×7 Cultural’s pay-what-you-want book vending machines located in subway stations. For travelers who weren’t planning on taking a lengthy journey however, the Netherland’s VertragingsApp now offers stories organized by the time it takes to read them for those stuck on a delayed service. READ MORE…
Smarter Cities - Android Apps on Google Play
Get the new Smarter Cities Scan Android App, which brings together a mobile portfolio of assets from IBM’s Smarter Cities initiative: posts about Smarter Cities from the asmarterplanet.com blog; the Smarter Cities Tumblr site; Smarter Cities news from around the world; the mobile optimized Smarter Cities site on ibm.com; the Smarter Cities Challenge program and even the People for a Smarter Planet community on Facebook.

Smarter Cities - Android Apps on Google Play

Get the new Smarter Cities Scan Android App, which brings together a mobile portfolio of assets from IBM’s Smarter Cities initiative: posts about Smarter Cities from the asmarterplanet.com blog; the Smarter Cities Tumblr site; Smarter Cities news from around the world; the mobile optimized Smarter Cities site on ibm.com; the Smarter Cities Challenge program and even the People for a Smarter Planet community on Facebook.

In addition to the iPhone app now available in the Apple App Store (that includes the new CitiesGeo feature built on the Smarter Cities Tumblr content), and the Smarter Planet and The Social Business apps on the Android Market, you can text yourself a link to download the Smarter Planet app customized by GetJar for other phones such as Nokia (Symbian) Palm (WebOS) and 2,100 smartphone models.

Get the Smarter Planet App for Android 

  • On an Android Phone now? This Android Market link will open the page to download. It will NOT work if you type it into a browser.
  • Not on a Android phone? When you are, open the Android Market app and search on Smarter Planet IBM.

Learn more about the app on AppBrain

smarterplanet:

Next American City » Columns » Not Just Publishing, But Collecting Data
Just as Internet and mobile technology can help local governments make their data available and accessible to the public, it can also help cities (and anyone else really) collect timely and accurate data more easily. And given that many community planning and economic development initiatives involve lots of data collection, there’s no lack of need for easier ways to gather information about a city or neighborhood. One particular useful online tool for doing just this is called EpiCollect, which provides a basic but very functional framework for developing mobile-phone enabled data collection projects. The application, which runs on the Google App Engine, features an easy-to-use online form builder to create a custom data collect form – just drag and drop. Once created, a form can be deployed via the EpiCollect mobile application – which is available for the iPhone and Android powered devices. Form data along with photos and location metadata can then be collected by anyone with access to the project, and submitted to a centralized hosted database. Submitted data can then be downloaded (in XML or CSV format) or viewed with Google Earth or Google Maps.

Next American City » Columns » Not Just Publishing, But Collecting Data

Just as Internet and mobile technology can help local governments make their data available and accessible to the public, it can also help cities (and anyone else really) collect timely and accurate data more easily. And given that many community planning and economic development initiatives involve lots of data collection, there’s no lack of need for easier ways to gather information about a city or neighborhood. One particular useful online tool for doing just this is called EpiCollect, which provides a basic but very functional framework for developing mobile-phone enabled data collection projects. The application, which runs on the Google App Engine, features an easy-to-use online form builder to create a custom data collect form – just drag and drop. Once created, a form can be deployed via the EpiCollect mobile application – which is available for the iPhone and Android powered devices. Form data along with photos and location metadata can then be collected by anyone with access to the project, and submitted to a centralized hosted database. Submitted data can then be downloaded (in XML or CSV format) or viewed with Google Earth or Google Maps.

smarterplanet:

CitySourced, a new app for Android, iPhone and Blackberry, helps you stay up to date on what’s going on in your area and helps get the word out on issues. For example, if you see a street light is out, you can take a picture of it and submit it. If you see graffiti, you can swipe a quick drive-by (careful!) picture and report it. Once an issue is reported, the app posts the problem, alerts City Hall, and puts a notice out on Twitter. www.androidphonesblog.com CitySourced for Android keeps you informed on issues in your city

smarterplanet:

CitySourced, a new app for Android, iPhone and Blackberry, helps you stay up to date on what’s going on in your area and helps get the word out on issues. For example, if you see a street light is out, you can take a picture of it and submit it. If you see graffiti, you can swipe a quick drive-by (careful!) picture and report it. Once an issue is reported, the app posts the problem, alerts City Hall, and puts a notice out on Twitter. www.androidphonesblog.com CitySourced for Android keeps you informed on issues in your city

smarterplanet:

Find and Share Parking With  Open Spot App | Android Central
Finding a parking spot just got a little easier, thanks to Google’s new Open Spot app for Android. The concept is simple enough, fire up the app to see what spots are near (.9 mile radius) you, and the color of the pin tells you how long it’s been since someone marked it. Red means ‘freshly-marked’, orange pins mean the spot was marked 5 minutes ago, and the yellow spots are older than 10 minutes — after 20 minutes they disappear.

smarterplanet:

Find and Share Parking With Open Spot App | Android Central

Finding a parking spot just got a little easier, thanks to Google’s new Open Spot app for Android. The concept is simple enough, fire up the app to see what spots are near (.9 mile radius) you, and the color of the pin tells you how long it’s been since someone marked it. Red means ‘freshly-marked’, orange pins mean the spot was marked 5 minutes ago, and the yellow spots are older than 10 minutes — after 20 minutes they disappear.