MIAMI – Residents and visitors of Wynwood can now enjoy the neighborhood’s first permanent artistic crosswalk, marked by a work that seeks to transform the intersection of Northwest Second Avenue and 25th Street.
The effort is part of the Miami Biennale and WADA’s ‘Wynwood Ways’, a collaboration to make the neighborhood a more pedestrian-friendly cultural destination.
-Source: Wynwood

MIAMI – Residents and visitors of Wynwood can now enjoy the neighborhood’s first permanent artistic crosswalk, marked by a work that seeks to transform the intersection of Northwest Second Avenue and 25th Street.

The effort is part of the Miami Biennale and WADA’s ‘Wynwood Ways’, a collaboration to make the neighborhood a more pedestrian-friendly cultural destination.

-Source: Wynwood

(via thisbigcity)

Seeding the City

mirthandwonder:

Seeding the City - a plan for greening the urban experience - is the latest large scale public art project by artist Eve S. Mosher. Mosher says this project is all about POTENTIAL -potential for community action, potential for more green roof, potential for change. These are small green modules (less than four square feet), but they get people thinking about environmental issues.

tayloransley:

WebUrbanist: Itty Bitty Cities
Many cool images of scale city models, with neat stories.  A full scale reproduction of the San Francisco Bay seems like the most useful example here, but many of the others are incredibly rich in detail and effort.  Like the model of Manhattan pictured above:

It was built over the course of about 2,000 working hours by software engineer Michael Chesko. He wasn’t building the model in a professional capacity; he was simply having fun. He hand-carved each tiny piece from balsa wood using nothing more than an X-Acto knife, a nail file, and a Dremel. The impressive 1:3200 model now rests in New York’s Skyscraper Museum after being hand-delivered by Chesko and his wife; amazingly, neither had ever set foot in the city before that day.

tayloransley:

WebUrbanist: Itty Bitty Cities

Many cool images of scale city models, with neat stories.  A full scale reproduction of the San Francisco Bay seems like the most useful example here, but many of the others are incredibly rich in detail and effort.  Like the model of Manhattan pictured above:

It was built over the course of about 2,000 working hours by software engineer Michael Chesko. He wasn’t building the model in a professional capacity; he was simply having fun. He hand-carved each tiny piece from balsa wood using nothing more than an X-Acto knife, a nail file, and a Dremel. The impressive 1:3200 model now rests in New York’s Skyscraper Museum after being hand-delivered by Chesko and his wife; amazingly, neither had ever set foot in the city before that day.

She sees the city growing, she sees it growing urged on by its own lively expectations, she sees tall chimneys sprouting like thorns in a field of miracles, clusters of chimneys that hide the sky with their smoke … She sees the towers grow sharp and streets tear themselves up – open wounds, turgid veins through which flows the dark blood of the city. She sees high buildings put their heads in the clouds … The city, the city! If it would only grow all at once, if it would stop swelling like ripe fruit, if its new houses would only catch up with Barbara’s old one … Let the houses just arrive into the garden and devour it in stone, ground up by the great cement jaws of the city until nothing is left but a few, stunted rosebushes.

Dulce-Maria Loynaz, Jardin (trans. Claudia Lightfoot) (via tentacular)

San Fransisco, 1905

Shot from the front of a tram, a pleasant seven minute trip into downtown San Fransisco just before the earthquake and fire.

Putting cameras on the front of moving vehicles (particularly trains and streetcars) was big entertainment in the first days of cinema, see the similar The Haverstraw Tunnel (1897), or Tram Ride Into Halifax (1902) and Ride On A Tram Car Through Belfast (1901) from the superlative Mitchell and Kenyon collection held by the BFI. The idea of moving whilst sat in a cinema seat, drawn through the scenery as if by some sort of phantom force, particularly engaged turn-of-the-century cinema-goers: creating moving shots using the rudimentary camera equipment was otherwise near impossible.

A hundred years later, this type of film gives a great idea of contemporary attitudes towards movement and mobility in urban areas. Of particular interest in this example, for instance, is the prevalent attitude towards shared street space, a concept which is beginning to come back into vogue. Note as well the absence of any street furniture, signage or clutter.

(via ), originally posted at undercreative.tumblr.com

creative-cities:

From Non-profit galleries pop-up in vacant sites | The Art Newspaper:
Non-profit arts organisations and curators are following their commercial equivalents in New York, with a wave of “pop-up” galleries taking advantage of the recessionary real-estate market to strike up partnerships with realtors to stage free exhibitions.
No Longer Empty, founded by a group of curators, has staged shows in a former fishing tackle store in Chelsea, a downtown luxury condominium, and empty factory on Brooklyn’s Bergen Street in the past few months. The exhibitions have shown artists ranging from grandees such as Yoko Ono to rising stars like Rafael Lozano-Hemmer and Michael Bevilacqua. According to Manon Slome, one of the founders, realtors are happy to offer vacant properties for shows which can attract up to 3,000 visitors at openings. “One realtor said to me they couldn’t get as many people through the door with a $5,000 ad as we bring in,” she said.
But property owners already see a variety of incentives to provide space for art programming. In perhaps the highest-profile instance, Trinity Real Estate recently partnered with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) to create LentSpace, an open-air sculpture park on an undeveloped plot downtown. “We wanted to have a temporary use there that would be more interested in a parking lot, and we reached out to the LMCC because they have a history of putting on temporary exhibitions,” says Erin Roeder, Trinity’s director of strategic neighbourhood development. The project is planned to last two years, but could end sooner or later depending on the economy. “The property will of course be more valuable when the market comes back,” she says.
Founded months before the economic crash, the non-profit Smartspaces operates on the “working hypothesis that there is a way to do this that provides value for everyone, because for this to grow on a larger scale and be sustainable through boom and bust times, everybody’s incentives have to be aligned,” says director Ellen Scott. “We found out early on in real estate it’s really about the bottom line.”

creative-cities:

From Non-profit galleries pop-up in vacant sites | The Art Newspaper:

Non-profit arts organisations and curators are following their commercial equivalents in New York, with a wave of “pop-up” galleries taking advantage of the recessionary real-estate market to strike up partnerships with realtors to stage free exhibitions.

No Longer Empty, founded by a group of curators, has staged shows in a former fishing tackle store in Chelsea, a downtown luxury condominium, and empty factory on Brooklyn’s Bergen Street in the past few months. The exhibitions have shown artists ranging from grandees such as Yoko Ono to rising stars like Rafael Lozano-Hemmer and Michael Bevilacqua. According to Manon Slome, one of the founders, realtors are happy to offer vacant properties for shows which can attract up to 3,000 visitors at openings. “One realtor said to me they couldn’t get as many people through the door with a $5,000 ad as we bring in,” she said.

But property owners already see a variety of incentives to provide space for art programming. In perhaps the highest-profile instance, Trinity Real Estate recently partnered with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) to create LentSpace, an open-air sculpture park on an undeveloped plot downtown. “We wanted to have a temporary use there that would be more interested in a parking lot, and we reached out to the LMCC because they have a history of putting on temporary exhibitions,” says Erin Roeder, Trinity’s director of strategic neighbourhood development. The project is planned to last two years, but could end sooner or later depending on the economy. “The property will of course be more valuable when the market comes back,” she says.

Founded months before the economic crash, the non-profit Smartspaces operates on the “working hypothesis that there is a way to do this that provides value for everyone, because for this to grow on a larger scale and be sustainable through boom and bust times, everybody’s incentives have to be aligned,” says director Ellen Scott. “We found out early on in real estate it’s really about the bottom line.”