bauldoff:

This beautiful unassuming two-story library building in Thailand was built with natural lava stone from the site, concrete, wood, and bamboo. The project was a cooperative between Rintala Eggertsson Architects and students from NTNU Trondheim University for the children of Ban Tha Song Yang villiage’s Safe Haven Orphanage.
The task was to use local materials and building technics to create a building that would solve the problems of education in the orphanage the best possible way. At the same time, natural ventilation systems and sunshades were studied and introduced into the building.
(via Young and Brilliant)

bauldoff:


This beautiful unassuming two-story library building in Thailand was built with natural lava stone from the site, concrete, wood, and bamboo. The project was a cooperative between Rintala Eggertsson Architects and students from NTNU Trondheim University for the children of Ban Tha Song Yang villiage’s Safe Haven Orphanage.

The task was to use local materials and building technics to create a building that would solve the problems of education in the orphanage the best possible way. At the same time, natural ventilation systems and sunshades were studied and introduced into the building.

(via Young and Brilliant)

electricpower:

Konarka’s Power Plastic Turns Buildings into Power Plants 
Solar energy innovator Konarka is out to prove that you can have your sustainable cake and eat it, too.  The Massachusetts-based company has launched a pilot project that will integrate its proprietary Power Plastic solar panels into the non-loadbearing exterior wall of a building, called acurtain wall. The new design makes solar energy a seamless part of the building rather than an afterthought.
The solar energy curtain wall project will be constructed in Tamarac, Florida, at an office building owned by Arch Aluminum & Glass Co., Inc. Arch and Konarka have teamed up to demonstrate that an active solar glass wall could enable the structure of a building to generate sustainable energy for its internal operations.  For now the partners appear to be focused on commercial and industrial applications, but if the curtain wall proves cost-effective it could also open the door for integrated solar panels in a wide range of residential and institutional structures.
CleanTechnica

electricpower:

Konarka’s Power Plastic Turns Buildings into Power Plants

Solar energy innovator Konarka is out to prove that you can have your sustainable cake and eat it, too.  The Massachusetts-based company has launched a pilot project that will integrate its proprietary Power Plastic solar panels into the non-loadbearing exterior wall of a building, called acurtain wall. The new design makes solar energy a seamless part of the building rather than an afterthought.

The solar energy curtain wall project will be constructed in Tamarac, Florida, at an office building owned by Arch Aluminum & Glass Co., Inc. Arch and Konarka have teamed up to demonstrate that an active solar glass wall could enable the structure of a building to generate sustainable energy for its internal operations.  For now the partners appear to be focused on commercial and industrial applications, but if the curtain wall proves cost-effective it could also open the door for integrated solar panels in a wide range of residential and institutional structures.

CleanTechnica