Making Smarter Cities By Making Smarter Systems | Co.Exist
A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.
The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.
The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.
By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.
What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.
People are Sensors
Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.
With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.

Making Smarter Cities By Making Smarter Systems | Co.Exist

A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.

The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.

The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.

By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.

What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.

People are Sensors

Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.

With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.

Artful Intelligence: How “Smart Windows” and “Dynamic Glass” Can Save Energy

Source: Fast Company

A manufacturer of auto-tinting windows just nabbed another $10 million in financing. Is this the future of glass?

In the future, those glass windows on your office building might also be able to beat IBM’s Watson at Jeopardy. That’s how smart glass is getting. 

Soladigm, manufacturers of auto-tinting “smart glass,” nabbed $10 million in equity financing, building off a recent $30 million round in December.

The notion of “smart glass” might at first seem a bit excessive. We demand intelligence from our partners, our friends, our colleagues, and lately our phones, but windows are not an entity that seem to necessitate smartness.

There’s a simple reason why smart, or “dynamic,” glass matters, though. It saves energy. When normal old “dumb” windows welcome in the noonday sun, buildings bake. But Soladigm’s electrochromics glass automatically adjusts its tint, helping regulate the temperature of a building and thereby reducing cooling (or heating) costs. The company claims its windows can reduce heating and cooling usage by a quarter. That’s one reason why the company was named a winner of GE’s Ecomagination challenge last year.

Soladigm has competitors, including the Saint-Gobain-backed Sage. And we recently looked at a company, Peer+, that manufactures a different kind of “smart glass”—windows that double as solar panels, generating electricity themselves. Imagine, then, if the two joined forces to make “genius glass” that both saves energy and generates it.

Five Sustainability Tools for the Built Environment and Beyond

thisbigcity:

With sustainability an increasingly important factor in decision-making, building developments are less likely to be driven by economic gain alone. To be considered truly sustainable, social, environmental and economic needs must be taken into account. However, achieving comprehensive sustainability is complex, resulting in numerous tools emerging for a sustainable built environment and beyond. Here are five of them:

1. BREEAM

The Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) is an environmental rating scheme that awards credits based on sustainability considerations. On completion of a review by a BREEAM accredited assessor, a building can be awarded Pass, Good, Very Good, Excellent, or Outstanding rating. British in origin, the scheme has inspired international equivalents.

Read More

The IBM Maximo Everyplace iPhone Experience Demo 

IBM Delivers New Mobile Software for Smarter Maintenance of Cities, Campuses and Businesses

University of Texas Medical Branch uses IBM software to gain intelligence on thousands of physical assets across its campus

The IBM Maximo asset manager software allows organizations to keep track of the equipment they own–such as vehicles, buildings or expensive testing equipment–as well as schedule service for these items.

New lab seeks ways to make cities smarter than ever | Smart Grid
Can smart technologies make the cities of the future safer, smarter and more energy efficient? A new collaborative research lab in the US is being launched to seek potential answers to that question. IBM and Pennsylvania’s Carnegie Mellon University have teamed up to create the new laboratory, set to begin operations this fall, as part of the Pennsylvania Smart Infrastructure Incubator (PSII). The incubator is a state and industry initiative aimed at developing advanced technologies for managing building, energy, water and other infrastructure elements that are critical to the functioning of cities. “Making the infrastructure of our cities, communities and industries more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent can make it more sustainable from both an economic and an environmental perspective,” said Wayne Balta, vice president of corporate environmental affairs and product safety for IBM. The IBM Smarter Infrastructure Lab at Carnegie Mellon will work on technologies that are consistent with both organisations’ existing sustainability initiatives, including IBM’s Smarter Planet program and the university’s work at its Centre for Sensed Critical Infrastructure Research. 

New lab seeks ways to make cities smarter than ever | Smart Grid

Can smart technologies make the cities of the future safer, smarter and more energy efficient? A new collaborative research lab in the US is being launched to seek potential answers to that question. IBM and Pennsylvania’s Carnegie Mellon University have teamed up to create the new laboratory, set to begin operations this fall, as part of the Pennsylvania Smart Infrastructure Incubator (PSII). The incubator is a state and industry initiative aimed at developing advanced technologies for managing building, energy, water and other infrastructure elements that are critical to the functioning of cities. “Making the infrastructure of our cities, communities and industries more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent can make it more sustainable from both an economic and an environmental perspective,” said Wayne Balta, vice president of corporate environmental affairs and product safety for IBM. The IBM Smarter Infrastructure Lab at Carnegie Mellon will work on technologies that are consistent with both organisations’ existing sustainability initiatives, including IBM’s Smarter Planet program and the university’s work at its Centre for Sensed Critical Infrastructure Research. 

Rotating Solar House Generates Five Times The Energy It Consumes | Techcrunch
What’s cooler than a rotating house? One whose solar panels produce five times the energy the house uses. That’s pretty incredible, considering that even zero-energy structures are rare. German architect Rolf Disch built the home, called Heliotrope, to follow the sun throughout the day. The structure features triple panes of thermally insulated glass to strike a balance between letting light in and keeping the house cooler inside.

Rotating Solar House Generates Five Times The Energy It Consumes | Techcrunch

What’s cooler than a rotating house? One whose solar panels produce five times the energy the house uses. That’s pretty incredible, considering that even zero-energy structures are rare. German architect Rolf Disch built the home, called Heliotrope, to follow the sun throughout the day. The structure features triple panes of thermally insulated glass to strike a balance between letting light in and keeping the house cooler inside.