Start-up fights power thieves, pot growers | SmartPlanet
Billions of dollars worth of electricity is stolen each year by folks tapping into power lines to bring free energy into their homes, businesses and increasingly, to their indoor pot growing operations. It’s an incessant global problem that’s expected to get worse as demand for power grows.
Awesense, a Canadian start-up that has remained largely under the radar since its founding in 2009, has launched a service to help utilities curb power losses and recover revenue lost by theft, transformer overloads and other equipment failures.

Start-up fights power thieves, pot growers | SmartPlanet

Billions of dollars worth of electricity is stolen each year by folks tapping into power lines to bring free energy into their homes, businesses and increasingly, to their indoor pot growing operations. It’s an incessant global problem that’s expected to get worse as demand for power grows.

Awesense, a Canadian start-up that has remained largely under the radar since its founding in 2009, has launched a service to help utilities curb power losses and recover revenue lost by theft, transformer overloads and other equipment failures.

Edmonton is among the smartest cities in the world when it comes to the innovative use of information technology to benefit citizens. Technology giant IBM has named Edmonton as the first Canadian city – and one of just 24 worldwide – to receive an IBM Smarter Cities Challenge grant of up to US$400,000.


Short film by the Congress of New Urbanism, an advocacy group for more pedestrian friendly neighborhoods and diversity of housing types, highlighting instances where highways have decreased quality of life and property values for communities, and removing them vastly improved, well, everything.  I would say, they do have a point - unless you’re travelling interstate, highways don’t always speed things along.   

Fun fact from the video: Vancouver, BC doesn’t have ANY highways! And yet they get along just fine.

Extra: another video case study from the city of Portland, Oregon which also did away with certain stretches of freeway and filled in the areas with…parks. Leslie Knope would be proud.  

via hwysnbywys:

(via )

10 Principles of Sustainable Urban Transport

michaelpoos:

The following 10 Principles were created by the Institute of Transportation and Development Policy to “meet the challenges of rapid population growth and climate change while improving competitiveness.”  

  1. Walk the walk: Create great pedestrian environments.
  2. Powered by people: Create a great environment for bicycles and other non-motorized vehicles.
  3. Get on the bus: Provide great, cost-effective public transport.
  4. Cruise control: Provide access for clean passenger vehicles at safe speeds and in significantly reduced numbers.
  5. Deliver the goods: Service the city in the cleanest and safest manner.
  6. Mix it up: Mix people and activities, buildings and spaces.
  7. Fill it in: Build dense, people and transit oriented urban districts that are desirable.
  8. Get real: Preserve and enhance the local, natural, cultural, social and historical assets.
  9. Connect the blocks: Make walking trips more direct, interesting and productive with small-size, permeable buildings and blocks.
  10. Make it last: Build for the long term. Sustainable cities bridge generations. They are memorable, malleable, built from quality materials, and well maintained.

You can read more about them here.

Livable cities

I love the way people are thinking about making places human-scale - you know, the kinds of neighborhoods you can explore on foot or on bicycle instead of in a car. http://www.livablecities.org/

Toronto is starting to feel more livable for me. Public transit, lots of neighborhoods with distinctive character, lots of events… I’d love to see more biking facilities and more local stores!

Sacha Chua Toronto, Canada