Spaniards Trade Cars For Lifetime Trolley Pass

Image Credit: www.mejorentranvia.com via springwise.com

To get citizens out of their cars and onto a newly-opened public trolley system, the city of Murcia, Spain recently embarked on a rather radical campaign: it offered people lifetime trolley passes in exchange for permanently reliquishing their cars.

Despite the growing popularity of hybrid and electric vehicles, giving up your car is still the single best way to reduce your carbon footprint. Car sharing services like Zipcar and RelayRides make a significant impact, but the bottom line is that those vehicles still contribute to poor air quality, traffic, and wear and tear on the roadways.

But not everyone lives in a bikeable or walkable city, and public transportation, at least in the United States, is usually only a option for those that live in dense metropolitan areas. So convincing people that they can survive without their cars takes some creative marketing.

UK’s first fuel cell-powered black cab hits the streets of London 
It may not look much different than your average black cab on the  outside (decals aside), but it’s quite a different story under the hood  of this taxi, which has just been deemed road legal in the UK. Developed  by Intelligent Energy, the cab actually includes both a fuel cell with a  30 kW net output and a 14 kWh lithium polymer battery pack, which  combined promise to provide enough juice for a full day of operation —  along with a top speed of 81 MPH and acceleration from zero to sixty in  fourteen seconds. Londoners won’t be seeing them everywhere just yet,  however, as the company only expects the first fleet to be ready  sometime next year in time for the 2012 Olympics.
Source: Engadget

UK’s first fuel cell-powered black cab hits the streets of London

It may not look much different than your average black cab on the outside (decals aside), but it’s quite a different story under the hood of this taxi, which has just been deemed road legal in the UK. Developed by Intelligent Energy, the cab actually includes both a fuel cell with a 30 kW net output and a 14 kWh lithium polymer battery pack, which combined promise to provide enough juice for a full day of operation — along with a top speed of 81 MPH and acceleration from zero to sixty in fourteen seconds. Londoners won’t be seeing them everywhere just yet, however, as the company only expects the first fleet to be ready sometime next year in time for the 2012 Olympics.

Source: Engadget

Trends & Transportation: Younger Generation Prefer Electronics Over Cars - CNBC
Kal Gyimesi IBM Institute for Business Value
Today, a confluence of events is starting to change all that. Industry research indicates that younger people don’t value vehicle ownership like their older (over thirty) brothers and sisters or their parents do. It’s no accident that many of these younger folks are leading an urbanization movement, the exact opposite of the stampede to the suburbs that characterized their parents’ and grandparents’ generations. In the city, younger drivers today see cars as an underutilized, expensive and hard to keep asset. Even in suburban and rural areas, young people often have a desire to live environmentally sustainable lives, and increasingly take a dim view of owning gas- or diesel-powered cars.

Trends & Transportation: Younger Generation Prefer Electronics Over Cars - CNBC

Kal Gyimesi IBM Institute for Business Value

Today, a confluence of events is starting to change all that. Industry research indicates that younger people don’t value vehicle ownership like their older (over thirty) brothers and sisters or their parents do. It’s no accident that many of these younger folks are leading an urbanization movement, the exact opposite of the stampede to the suburbs that characterized their parents’ and grandparents’ generations. In the city, younger drivers today see cars as an underutilized, expensive and hard to keep asset. Even in suburban and rural areas, young people often have a desire to live environmentally sustainable lives, and increasingly take a dim view of owning gas- or diesel-powered cars.

plainpaul:

From StreetFilms.org:

“Fixing the Great Mistake” is a new Streetfilms series that examines what went wrong in the early part of the 20th Century, when our cities began catering to the automobile, and how those decisions continue to affect our lives today.

In this episode, Transportation Alternatives director Paul Steely White shows how planning for cars drastically altered Park Avenue. Watch and see what Park Avenue used to look like, how we ceded it to the automobile, and what we need to do to reclaim the street as a space where people take precedence over traffic.