How Chicago Is Building a Better City With Big Data | People For Smarter Cities
Urban design is no longer just for architects and city planners: Citizens also are getting into the act.
Chicago is one example of how data collected from residents transforms urban design. The project’s aim is to highlight how data generated by citizens can be used to make cities a better place to live. Where does this information come from? It can be gathered from sensors on water pipes that detect leaks, for one. Or it could be as simple as data culled from city-to-citizen social-media engagement. Armed with this, architects, planners and engineers can draw up, create and implement programs in areas such as public safety and transportation that are designed to improve residents’ quality of life.

How Chicago Is Building a Better City With Big Data | People For Smarter Cities

Urban design is no longer just for architects and city planners: Citizens also are getting into the act.

Chicago is one example of how data collected from residents transforms urban design. The project’s aim is to highlight how data generated by citizens can be used to make cities a better place to live. Where does this information come from? It can be gathered from sensors on water pipes that detect leaks, for one. Or it could be as simple as data culled from city-to-citizen social-media engagement. Armed with this, architects, planners and engineers can draw up, create and implement programs in areas such as public safety and transportation that are designed to improve residents’ quality of life.

Green Lane Project in New York: City to City Solutions

The Green Lane Project is a partnership of six U.S. cities working to implement next-generation protected bike lanes on city streets. 

The Green Lane Project cities are: San Francisco, Memphis, Chicago, Portland, Austin, and Washington, D.C.

nprfreshair:

The World Cities That Tweet the Most
The study, released by Paris-based Semiocast, tracked the number of tweets with location info in the month of June, 2012. New York is the top U.S. city for tweets, outranking Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Atlanta, and Houston. San Francisco, the city that the social media company calls home, doesn’t make an appearance in the top 20. 
Read more.[Image: Semiocast]

nprfreshair:

The World Cities That Tweet the Most

The study, released by Paris-based Semiocast, tracked the number of tweets with location info in the month of June, 2012. New York is the top U.S. city for tweets, outranking Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Atlanta, and Houston. San Francisco, the city that the social media company calls home, doesn’t make an appearance in the top 20. 

Read more.[Image: Semiocast]

ibmsocialbiz:

A team of IBMers and Social Media Week are working together on a kind of grassroots, crowdsourced research. Share your views on Social Commerce and help us scan and analyze the collective intelligence of the Social Media Week global community.
Answer Today’s Social Commerce Scan | Question 2. Global/Local:
What  would make commerce smarter via social media in Beirut? Berlin? Bogota?  Buenos Aires? Chicago? Glasgow? Tell us what it means for you in your  Social Media Week city: Los Angeles, Milan, Moscow, Rio, Sao Paulo or  Vancouver.

About the Scan

ibmsocialbiz:

A team of IBMers and Social Media Week are working together on a kind of grassroots, crowdsourced research. Share your views on Social Commerce and help us scan and analyze the collective intelligence of the Social Media Week global community.

Answer Today’s Social Commerce Scan | Question 2. Global/Local:



What would make commerce smarter via social media in Beirut? Berlin? Bogota? Buenos Aires? Chicago? Glasgow? Tell us what it means for you in your Social Media Week city: Los Angeles, Milan, Moscow, Rio, Sao Paulo or Vancouver.


About the Scan

What would make commerce smarter via social media in Beirut? Berlin? Bogota? Buenos Aires? Chicago? Glasgow? Tell us what it means for you in your Social Media Week city: Los Angeles, Milan, Moscow, Rio, Sao Paulo or Vancouver.

Social Commerce Scan Question 2 | Global/Local:

Join the Scan for Social Media Week, happening across cities around the world

Protected bicycle parking at Union Station?

No such place exists according to this thread on Chainlink.

Not good planning on this one Chicago. 

Update - sent messages to Metra, Amtrak and the city saying they should get on top of this. Monday morning procrastination at it’s best. 

via thegreenurbanist:

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel aims to encourage urban agriculture - chicagotribune.com
Urban farmers were delighted Tuesday when Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced a proposed ordinance that could make growing and selling fresh produce in Chicago much easier. In December, some of the biggest local names in urban agriculture had protested a previous proposal that they felt would stunt the growth of city gardens with cumbersome rules on plot size, high-end fencing and produce sales in residential areas. Erika Allen, head of seven nonprofit Growing Power farms in Chicago, predicted at the time that her group’s work “would be over” if the zoning ordinance passed. But Tuesday morning, Emanuel chose Allen’s new Iron Street Farm in Bridgeport to present his proposed ordinance — one that marks a turnaround on almost every thorny issue in the last proposal. “We’ve been working really hard to see this happen,” said Allen, who served on the mayor’s transition team. “I think it’s just a new administration and a changing of the guard. Former Mayor (Richard) Daley was supportive, but there was a lot of opposition coming out of (the zoning department) that was very much entrenched in ‘this is the way it we do it.’”

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel aims to encourage urban agriculture - chicagotribune.com

Urban farmers were delighted Tuesday when Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced a proposed ordinance that could make growing and selling fresh produce in Chicago much easier.

In December, some of the biggest local names in urban agriculture had protested a previous proposal that they felt would stunt the growth of city gardens with cumbersome rules on plot size, high-end fencing and produce sales in residential areas.

Erika Allen, head of seven nonprofit Growing Power farms in Chicago, predicted at the time that her group’s work “would be over” if the zoning ordinance passed.

But Tuesday morning, Emanuel chose Allen’s new Iron Street Farm in Bridgeport to present his proposed ordinance — one that marks a turnaround on almost every thorny issue in the last proposal.

“We’ve been working really hard to see this happen,” said Allen, who served on the mayor’s transition team. “I think it’s just a new administration and a changing of the guard. Former Mayor (Richard) Daley was supportive, but there was a lot of opposition coming out of (the zoning department) that was very much entrenched in ‘this is the way it we do it.’”