Children who live in walkable areas, with a child-friendly park nearby and access to healthy food have 59% lower odds of being obese. More on This Big City.
兒童若居住在適合步行的環境,住家附近又有兒童公園,亦有商家販售健康食品,肥胖機率會下降59%。更多內容請見《城事》。
thisbigcity:

Children who live in walkable areas, with a child-friendly park nearby and access to healthy food have 59% lower odds of being obese. More on This Big City.

兒童若居住在適合步行的環境,住家附近又有兒童公園,亦有商家販售健康食品,肥胖機率會下降59%。更多內容請見《城事》。

thisbigcity:

nycarra:

Thanks in part to ARRA funding, solar energy capacity in New York City has increased 800 percent since 2007, with many more solar installations in the “pipeline.”  This increase parallels the quadrupling of solar installation companies now doing business in NYC, demonstrating the economic benefits of enabling the solar market in this city of a million rooftops.

Six years ago, NYC had just one megawatt of installed solar power, and the local solar market faced extensive technical, administrative and policy barriers.  A collaborative partnership, led by the City University of New York (CUNY), was formed that includes the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability and the New York City Economic Development Corporation.  Together they are implementing a plan to systematically remove those barriers in order to support large-scale solar energy market growth.  The partners have secured three consecutive U.S. Department of Energy grants, including an ARRA grant, that led to the development of five NYC Solar Empowerment Zones, NYC Solar Ombudsman, and the world’s largest LiDAR based map: the NYC Solar Map.  The map utilizes 15 billion points of data to estimate the solar energy potential for every building in NYC.  Since its launch in June of 2011, the map has received over 150,000 hits, serving as an interactive tool for New Yorkers by educating them about the costs, benefits, and payback periods of investing in solar installations for their properties.

City University of New York, NYC Economic Development Corporation and Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Sustainability, Solar Market Transformation

studio630:

The Future of the City: Crowd-Sourcing & Gamification of City 2.0
By Kyle Rogler, Studio630
This summer Google will install a 1-gigabyte internet speed cable in Kansas City, which is a hundred times faster than the average broadband cable. This new asset will help revolutionize Kansas City’s technology infrastructure, but no one knows exactly how to utilize it to its fullest potential. James Moore proposes a novel idea which could generate interest back toward the city through crowd-sourcing and gamification of urban design.
Read More at ThisBigCity

studio630:

The Future of the City: Crowd-Sourcing & Gamification of City 2.0

By Kyle Rogler, Studio630

This summer Google will install a 1-gigabyte internet speed cable in Kansas City, which is a hundred times faster than the average broadband cable. This new asset will help revolutionize Kansas City’s technology infrastructure, but no one knows exactly how to utilize it to its fullest potential. James Moore proposes a novel idea which could generate interest back toward the city through crowd-sourcing and gamification of urban design.

Read More at ThisBigCity

Technology will play a central role in determining whether future cities are harmonious, vibrant and sustainable or discontented, wasteful and unsustainable. Efficient future cities will integrate technologies to reduce their environmental impacts while sustainably coping with growing populations.

A recent report by Lux Research identifies seven cities that could be used as models for smart cities in the future.
carl-vs-karl:

Walking an biking to elementary school used to be common. Now it`s rare. What happened? We started building fewer, bigger schools between neighborhoods. We built new wide roads to reduce congestion on the way to school. We thought schools would be safer away from Main Street, with its sidewalks of commerce and distractions. We can see the consequences now, making connections between those decisions and rising health problems. With better information, can we make our neighborhood intelligent? We can.What makes a city intelligent? You do. Text: Jan Gehl: Infographic by The National Building Museum in Washington DC

carl-vs-karl:

Walking an biking to elementary school used to be common. Now it`s rare. What happened? We started building fewer, bigger schools between neighborhoods. We built new wide roads to reduce congestion on the way to school. We thought schools would be safer away from Main Street, with its sidewalks of commerce and distractions. We can see the consequences now, making connections between those decisions and rising health problems. With better information, can we make our neighborhood intelligent? We can.
What makes a city intelligent? You do.
Text: Jan Gehl: Infographic by The National Building Museum in Washington DC

(via carl-vs-karl)