Putting Citizens First Is a Big Part of Big Data

Today, more than 2 billion people use social media. These are friends connecting with each other, empowered consumers engaging with their favorite (or least favorite) brands, and most recently, these are citizens reaching out to their local and even federal governments.

As increasingly digital and social populations meet a lingering global economic recession, citizens have greater expectations of their government leaders than ever before — expectations centered on “open” principles such as accessibility, transparency, collaboration and participation. Tapping into this hunger for public engagement — and the voluminous data that results — can help governments in anything from city planning, fraud prevention, public safety, combating traffic jams and event seeking new voters.

Smaller Cities Unite: How Citizen Diplomacy Can Help Communities Innovate | Good
What does Copenhagen have in common with Providence, Rhode Island? Both are small cities known globally for their arts and design communities, academics, and their locations as “gateway cities” in their regions. But each is unique as well: Copenhagen, for example, is a world leader in bike infrastructure and energy independence, and Providence is becoming known for its unique approach to mentoring innovators working in areas ranging from design, to social entrepreneurship, to edtech. These cities—along with other small cities around the world—have important lessons to learn from each other.

Smaller Cities Unite: How Citizen Diplomacy Can Help Communities Innovate | Good

What does Copenhagen have in common with Providence, Rhode Island? Both are small cities known globally for their arts and design communities, academics, and their locations as “gateway cities” in their regions. But each is unique as well: Copenhagen, for example, is a world leader in bike infrastructure and energy independence, and Providence is becoming known for its unique approach to mentoring innovators working in areas ranging from design, to social entrepreneurship, to edtech. These cities—along with other small cities around the world—have important lessons to learn from each other.

IBM Smarter Cities Challenge: About the Challenge: Newark, NJ
Mayor Booker asked the IBM team to find transformational opportunities in cost savings and revenue generation, as well as overall citizen and business experience with government. The IBM team produced a transformational framework for actionable improvement in Newark in both immediate and mid- to long-term time frames. The transformational framework included strategies for paperwork reduction, inter-departmental efficiency improvements, and citizen self-service opportunities. 

IBM Smarter Cities Challenge: About the Challenge: Newark, NJ

Mayor Booker asked the IBM team to find transformational opportunities in cost savings and revenue generation, as well as overall citizen and business experience with government. The IBM team produced a transformational framework for actionable improvement in Newark in both immediate and mid- to long-term time frames. The transformational framework included strategies for paperwork reduction, inter-departmental efficiency improvements, and citizen self-service opportunities. 

Advantages of having a business component-level blueprint of all public services.

Having a holistic view of the business of government will aid government leaders in their strategic thinking, and in decision making on initiatives or programs that must span multiple agencies or governmental jurisdictions. Having a unifying master business model of all areas of government, can help government officials to

1) identify opportunities to realize efficiencies,

2) deliver programs and services more effectively and innovatively,

3) identify and align roles and responsibilities to enhance collaboration across government (and beyond) and;

4) reduce time-to-service.

The ability to look across program area or jurisdictions and find areas where sharing services and collaboration for better outcomes can be realized.

Further if that master model or framework is developed such that it can be linked to more detailed business process descriptions of each of the individual program areas, where re-useable process specifications and performance measures can be readily share-able, then that framework becomes key the improvement efforts.

For example if the process specifications were readily available in three of the program areas that nearly all levels of government have a concern over:

  1. Immigrant, Resident and Citizen Services,
  2. Public Health Services,
  3. Social Services

Then that master model can be a significant accelerator for BPM technicians to identify and effect process efficiencies.

Using those three areas again, as an example, each has the need to register and authenticate individuals and assess their eligibility for services. Having identified this common need at the master model level, BPM techniques could then be employed to further detail the “as-is” processes, information, and performance metrics for each area, then using benchmarking establish a new “to be” design for an intake process, that could meet both the common and unique needs of all three areas. Then the most appropriate technology and organization structure upon with to implement these process improvements could be designed, business justified, and then implemented. The BPM tools could then further enable monitoring of the now new processes, to determine whether expected improvements had been achieved.

IBM (GovBAS) Government Business Architecture Services – IBM’s public sector government consulting services, based on the GovBAS blue-print, for more info contact, sloessl@us.ibm.com