Can You Design A Liveable Street? | FastCompany
What’s your vision for the street outside? More cars? Less bikes? New tram? Get rid of the palm trees? Whatever it is, there’s now an incredibly easy way of picturing it and sending it to your friends (or enemies) through software called Streetmix.

Can You Design A Liveable Street? | FastCompany

What’s your vision for the street outside? More cars? Less bikes? New tram? Get rid of the palm trees? Whatever it is, there’s now an incredibly easy way of picturing it and sending it to your friends (or enemies) through software called Streetmix.

Cities find new ways to use old infrastructure | Spacing
What if your local telephone booth was also an electric vehicle charging station?
Or construction scaffolding became a fun place to sit down and eat lunch?
Or a roadside billboard became a lush, air-cleaning bamboo garden?

Cities find new ways to use old infrastructure | Spacing

What if your local telephone booth was also an electric vehicle charging station?

Or construction scaffolding became a fun place to sit down and eat lunch?

Or a roadside billboard became a lush, air-cleaning bamboo garden?

Start Up Street - What will you start up?

I absolutely love the ambition of this! It’s a very commendable example of using local skills, knowledge and assets to make something bigger!

Architecture+Design Scotland have launched ‘Start Up Street” in Stirling (Scotland), in response to an ideas workshop attended by the members of the local community, business owners and the Council, to examine how to generate sustainable economic activity and employment opportunities locally in Stirling.  

The ‘start up street’ in Stirling is a local street that currently has 7 empty shops. They plan to use the underutilised assets to set up a hub to explore creative solutions that could stimulate and develop local enterprise and economic activity and deliver positive outcomes. To set the ball rolling the video also gives some great examples of various projects that could be launched that focus on health and well-being.

The High Street is a key element of our settlements. Its role as the central space of villages, towns and cities has been challenged by changes in the pattern of retail, of leisure, and living. In many High Streets in many settlements there are vacant and underutilised assets. In some cases the High Street is under pressure. It is an issue of concern for many, from businesses, to citizens, to investors.

Meeting the challenge of how to re-think the High Street as a central place requires creative thinking about how we make the best of what we already have. The communities in Stirling City Centre recently participated in a co-design exercise to re-think the centre of the City. The Urban Ideas Bakerybrought together citizens, officers of the Council, businesses and other stakeholders to look at how the people resources of the city and the spatial resources might be managed differently. Out of this thinking emerged an idea to re-consider King Street as a ‘start up street’, which enables business start ups, scaling of small business and curating events and activities in the public space. The proposal is to explore how people with ideas, talents and capabilities in the city can be matched with the available spaces in the city, supported by a community of interest. This idea is being tested in a prototype phase to engage a wide range of interests in exploring how the idea works, what is feasible, what is not. The objective is to use this practical method of testing the idea to develop a live project, to start small and build up a sustainable, self supporting enterprise.

The project is open to anyone with an interest in High Streets, how they work, and how they can be enhanced. This short video explains the thinking behind ‘Start Up Street’, whats involved and how you can get involved.

via irishboyinlondon:

Guardian Reports: How to become a cycling ‘ambassador’
I love this idea…it helps to promote a friendly, approachable and visible cycling culture in cities!

There is a rather unlikely new vogue word in cycling circles: ambassador….Just this week, a bike shop in Portland, Oregon – which is widely seen as a countercultural cycling nirvana in the automobile-loving US – launched an initiative it’s calling “21Ambassadors”. According to the mission statement:
“To ride a bicycle is to be part of a community, to share a common experience, as much as it is about good health and helping the environment […] We believe that as a community we should support each other in bad times as well as good. We, the 21 Ambassadors are here to help you. When tires flat and spokes break, when chains fail and gears groan, when you need a hand, we hope to be there to assist.”

The ambassadors’ commitments include:

• To stop and offer assistance to fellow cyclists.• To follow all rules of the road and set the standard for exemplary riding behaviour.• To carry their Road Aid kit with them on all rides.

Photo: Guardian
via irishboyinlondon:

Guardian Reports: How to become a cycling ‘ambassador’

I love this idea…it helps to promote a friendly, approachable and visible cycling culture in cities!

There is a rather unlikely new vogue word in cycling circles: ambassador….Just this week, a bike shop in Portland, Oregon – which is widely seen as a countercultural cycling nirvana in the automobile-loving US – launched an initiative it’s calling “21Ambassadors”. According to the mission statement:

“To ride a bicycle is to be part of a community, to share a common experience, as much as it is about good health and helping the environment […] We believe that as a community we should support each other in bad times as well as good. We, the 21 Ambassadors are here to help you. When tires flat and spokes break, when chains fail and gears groan, when you need a hand, we hope to be there to assist.”

The ambassadors’ commitments include:

• To stop and offer assistance to fellow cyclists.
• To follow all rules of the road and set the standard for exemplary riding behaviour.
• To carry their Road Aid kit with them on all rides.

Photo: Guardian

via irishboyinlondon:

brentgilliard:

If you know London, you’ll understand how ambitious this urban structure plan is. Click through for pdf.

It goes without saying that some municipal politicians (maybe many - a few years ago the “progressive” majority on council was slim, and I have not been following London politics closely) are resistant.

This needs to set in motion the creation and evaluation of concrete plans. My suspicion is that the red line, connecting downtown with two malls, two hospitals, and the university, is most viable.

I wonder which will happen first: light rail in London because the province offers up some funding or as a reaction to keep up with K-W’s new line?