How Big Data Can Boost Weather Forecasting | Smarter Planet Blog
Last September, when Typhoon Sanba smashed into the Korean peninsula, it packed winds so strong that they sent rocks flying through the air like missiles and caused massive power outages.
Increasing evidence of climate change worldwide is prompting governments and scientists to take action to protect people and property from its effects. 
IBM Research scientists are taking the lead in bringing the most sophisticated data analytics to bear on weather forecasting. Their long-term weather analysis project, called Deep Thunder, combines data with sophisticated mathematical algorithms and  computing power.

How Big Data Can Boost Weather Forecasting | Smarter Planet Blog

Last September, when Typhoon Sanba smashed into the Korean peninsula, it packed winds so strong that they sent rocks flying through the air like missiles and caused massive power outages.

Increasing evidence of climate change worldwide is prompting governments and scientists to take action to protect people and property from its effects. 

IBM Research scientists are taking the lead in bringing the most sophisticated data analytics to bear on weather forecasting. Their long-term weather analysis project, called Deep Thunder, combines data with sophisticated mathematical algorithms and  computing power.

Peter Calthorpe on ‘Resilient Cities: Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change’

From the California Academy of Sciences, via Fora TV:

This event is the second part of a two-part discussion featuring Bay Area architect and planner Peter Calthorpe, author of Sustainable Communities and Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change, discusses the aspects of a livable city.

Click here for part 1 featuring Timothy Beatley, author of Biophilic Cities and Resilient Cities. For more from Calthorpe check out his interview with Grist where he explains ‘Why urbanism is the cheapest, smartest way to fight climate change’.

via plantedcity:

polis: The Real Cost of Climate Change in Cities

Politically motivated underestimates by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are a severe threat to cities in the short and long term. In its last report, the IPCC does not seriously consider the meltdown and detachment of the two largest ice sheets at the planet’s poles, which could precipitate an “albedo flip” (critically reducing the earth’s capacity to reflect radiation), as James Hansen suggests in “Climate Change and Trace Gases” (PDF). In Hansen’s words, “the Earth is getting perilously close to climate changes that could run out of our control.”

Under pressure from large polluters, the IPCC calculated a probable 0.4-meter sea level rise. Considering all available scientific evidence, the rise will most likely reach several meters. The complete meltdown of the Greenland and West Antarctica ice sheets would cause a 13-meter rise; even a fraction of this would be a global catastrophe. Under these conditions, most of the world’s largest cities (Tokyo, New York, Seoul, Mumbai, LA, Manila, Shanghai, Jakarta, Karachi, Rio, Istanbul, Lagos, etc.) and smaller cities would have to confront the disastrous effects of rising temperatures and sea levels.

(via smarterplanet)

Climate Change and the World’s Cities: A Week to Remember | Citiscope
Neal Peirce, newspaper columnist, Washington Post Writers Group; chairman of the Citistates Group; lead author of Century of the City: No Time To Lose, based on the Rockefeller Foundation’s 2007 “Global Urban Summit” of city practitioners and scholars from around the world.
For the cities of the world, there’s rarely if ever been such a momentous single week.
     Faced with the potentially catastrophic impacts of climate change,  the C40 organization of world’s large cities met in this Brazilian  megacity to announce a set of landmark agreements.  All the accords,  said New York’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg, current C40 chairman and the  prime driver of its new initiatives, will be designed to undergird their  struggle against rising seas and disruptive weather patterns — in a  world in which cities as responsible, directly or indirectly, for up to  80 percent of global climate emissions.
     “The leaders of C40 Cities - the world’s megacities - hold the future in their hands,” Bloomberg asserted.
     As a first step, the three dozen C40 mayors confirmed a full  merger with the Clinton Climate Initiative, assuring added funding for a  centralized, high-grade professional staff as well as full-bore support  from former President Bill Clinton, who flew to São Paulo to seal and  celebrate the agreement.  Staff operations are global, with current  bases in London and New York.
     Clinton said his Climate Initiative’s Cities Program has  accomplished much in informal alliance with C40 since 2006 — for  example working with Los Angeles on gas-powered buses and added bike  lanes, and internationally on a total of 17 climate-positive  developments in 10 cities on five continents helping “more than 1  million people live and work in communities with no greenhouse-gas  emissions.”  But “the truth is,” Clinton added, “it’s not enough— to  save the future of the planet we also need good economics.”

Climate Change and the World’s Cities: A Week to Remember | Citiscope

Neal Peirce, newspaper columnist, Washington Post Writers Group; chairman of the Citistates Group; lead author of Century of the City: No Time To Lose, based on the Rockefeller Foundation’s 2007 “Global Urban Summit” of city practitioners and scholars from around the world.

For the cities of the world, there’s rarely if ever been such a momentous single week.

     Faced with the potentially catastrophic impacts of climate change, the C40 organization of world’s large cities met in this Brazilian megacity to announce a set of landmark agreements.  All the accords, said New York’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg, current C40 chairman and the prime driver of its new initiatives, will be designed to undergird their struggle against rising seas and disruptive weather patterns — in a world in which cities as responsible, directly or indirectly, for up to 80 percent of global climate emissions.

     “The leaders of C40 Cities - the world’s megacities - hold the future in their hands,” Bloomberg asserted.

     As a first step, the three dozen C40 mayors confirmed a full merger with the Clinton Climate Initiative, assuring added funding for a centralized, high-grade professional staff as well as full-bore support from former President Bill Clinton, who flew to São Paulo to seal and celebrate the agreement.  Staff operations are global, with current bases in London and New York.

     Clinton said his Climate Initiative’s Cities Program has accomplished much in informal alliance with C40 since 2006 — for example working with Los Angeles on gas-powered buses and added bike lanes, and internationally on a total of 17 climate-positive developments in 10 cities on five continents helping “more than 1 million people live and work in communities with no greenhouse-gas emissions.”  But “the truth is,” Clinton added, “it’s not enough— to save the future of the planet we also need good economics.”

socialisimo:

 
London has become uninhabitable. Every year spring tides surge through the Thames Barrier, making London the new Venice. But whereas the city of gondolas has come to terms with water, London is overwhelmed.
This image shows the impact of 7 metre flooding, the level required to breach the Thames Barrier. 
Image © Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones.

socialisimo:

London has become uninhabitable. Every year spring tides surge through the Thames Barrier, making London the new Venice. But whereas the city of gondolas has come to terms with water, London is overwhelmed.

This image shows the impact of 7 metre flooding, the level required to breach the Thames Barrier. 

Image © Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones.

(via thegreenurbanist)

This Big City — The Bionic City - A Natural Blueprint for Future Cities
Over millennia floods, earthquakes and fire have bought hell and high water to cities, leaving a path of death and destruction in their wake. Until now, no civilization has been spared from the worst-case scenarios that extreme meteorological and geological events have the capacity to create. However, the legacy of fear that surrounds many of our planet’s essential operating mechanisms, such as tectonic plate movements, need not continue and today’s disasters could be turned into tomorrow’s opportunities. The Bionic City takes sustainability within the urban built environment to its ultimate potential. While integrating solutions to meet the challenges presented by the fact that man has met eight of the nine biosphere limits, as defined by the Stockholm Resilience Centre, The Bionic City extends its remit to incorporate resilience to some of the most extreme scenarios that climate change will create.  

This Big City — The Bionic City - A Natural Blueprint for Future Cities

Over millennia floods, earthquakes and fire have bought hell and high water to cities, leaving a path of death and destruction in their wake. Until now, no civilization has been spared from the worst-case scenarios that extreme meteorological and geological events have the capacity to create. However, the legacy of fear that surrounds many of our planet’s essential operating mechanisms, such as tectonic plate movements, need not continue and today’s disasters could be turned into tomorrow’s opportunities. The Bionic City takes sustainability within the urban built environment to its ultimate potential. While integrating solutions to meet the challenges presented by the fact that man has met eight of the nine biosphere limits, as defined by the Stockholm Resilience Centre, The Bionic City extends its remit to incorporate resilience to some of the most extreme scenarios that climate change will create.