Today, municipalities and citizens more than ever need to understand their patterns of behavior and how to change them. Whether it is in water consumption, traffic patterns or energy use, they need new technologies to enable the change. Our sustainability initiatives in Dubuque prove that, by using advanced analytics, community engagement, and cloud computing, government officials and citizens will have access to real-time data to alter their patterns of behavior, which will save them money. This water sustainability pilot case is a template for communities worldwide that seek to conserve various types of resources.

Quote by Milind Naphade, program director, smarter city services, IBM Research.  Quote found at "Dubuque, Iowa and IBM Combine Analytics, Cloud Computing and Community Engagement to Conserve Water"
Next American City » Columns » Not Just Publishing, But Collecting Data
Just as Internet and mobile technology can help local governments make their data available and accessible to the public, it can also help cities (and anyone else really) collect timely and accurate data more easily. And given that many community planning and economic development initiatives involve lots of data collection, there’s no lack of need for easier ways to gather information about a city or neighborhood. One particular useful online tool for doing just this is called EpiCollect, which provides a basic but very functional framework for developing mobile-phone enabled data collection projects. The application, which runs on the Google App Engine, features an easy-to-use online form builder to create a custom data collect form – just drag and drop. Once created, a form can be deployed via the EpiCollect mobile application – which is available for the iPhone and Android powered devices. Form data along with photos and location metadata can then be collected by anyone with access to the project, and submitted to a centralized hosted database. Submitted data can then be downloaded (in XML or CSV format) or viewed with Google Earth or Google Maps.

Next American City » Columns » Not Just Publishing, But Collecting Data

Just as Internet and mobile technology can help local governments make their data available and accessible to the public, it can also help cities (and anyone else really) collect timely and accurate data more easily. And given that many community planning and economic development initiatives involve lots of data collection, there’s no lack of need for easier ways to gather information about a city or neighborhood. One particular useful online tool for doing just this is called EpiCollect, which provides a basic but very functional framework for developing mobile-phone enabled data collection projects. The application, which runs on the Google App Engine, features an easy-to-use online form builder to create a custom data collect form – just drag and drop. Once created, a form can be deployed via the EpiCollect mobile application – which is available for the iPhone and Android powered devices. Form data along with photos and location metadata can then be collected by anyone with access to the project, and submitted to a centralized hosted database. Submitted data can then be downloaded (in XML or CSV format) or viewed with Google Earth or Google Maps.

Smarter Cities use data to guide growth

Data is not exactly the sexiest thing in the world, but in #lovelansing, our local workforce development agency Capital Area Michigan Works! partners with our regional economic development organization Leap, Inc. to help economic developers, K-12 education, higher ed and business make smarter decisions about our future.

Based on labor market information from the Michigan Bureau of Labor Market Information and Strategic Initiatives and data from the US Department of Labor, Census Bureau and elsewhere, we gather a group of businesses each year to take a look at a specific sector or trend and ask, what’s happening in this particular industry? What are the trends? Growth? Decline? Do we have the workforce to meet those businesses’ demands now? In the future? And what more can be done to support businesses?

In the past, we’ve looked at manufacturing, healthcare, construction, IT, insurance and financial services, green jobs and the creative economy, as well as what will happen in the greater Lansing economy when the Baby Boomers retire. As a result of these studies, seven trade associations have been formed and received grant funding to help specific sectors address their workforce concerns.

In 2011, we’ll be focusing on talent. As home to Michigan State University, Lansing Community College and the Thomas M. Cooley Law School, along with more than a dozen other higher education institutions, we want to know what it takes to keep knowledge economy workers, and we want to know the truth about brain drain in Michigan.

Copies of the past four years’ reports are available at:

http://www.camw.org/MediaRoom

smarterplanet:

IBM Commercial Data Transportation: Data Analysis Makes For Efficient Transportation Solutions

http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/e… Harnessing real-time transportation data can help cut commute times and reduce carbon emissions. See how IBM is helping to build smarter transportation systems in places like Singapore and Stockholm.

This is data. Data generated by people moving through a city. People in cars on trains, on buses. When you can see data as it happens, it can help cut commute times by 50%, reduce carbon emissions by 14%. On a smarter planet, we can capture, analyze and use data in new ways to do what theyre doing in places like Singapore and Stockholm and build a smarter transportation system.

smarterplanet:

Data Show Best Corners to Hail a Cab in New York - NYTimes.com
The information, collected by GPS, can be used to create helpful tie-ins for customers, like a new smartphone program that lets mobile users locate the ideal nearby corner to hail a cab … Using the city’s GPS data, Sense Networks, a SoHo software analytics firm, examined the pickup point of every New York City cab ride taken in the first six months of 2009. The result was a free mobile application called CabSense, which was released this week for iPhones and Android phones. 

smarterplanet:

Data Show Best Corners to Hail a Cab in New York - NYTimes.com

The information, collected by GPS, can be used to create helpful tie-ins for customers, like a new smartphone program that lets mobile users locate the ideal nearby corner to hail a cab … Using the city’s GPS data, Sense Networks, a SoHo software analytics firm, examined the pickup point of every New York City cab ride taken in the first six months of 2009. The result was a free mobile application called CabSense, which was released this week for iPhones and Android phones.