Rochester, New York: Leading as a Healthy City (by IBMSocialMedia)

Rochester New York, is an example of a city that recognizes the unique opportunity that healthcare plays as the cornerstone of economic viability. They’ve worked to transform their healthcare system with ambition, vision and innovation to outperform and attract new business, jobs and foster economic development.

Kate Stohr on Investing in Cities | Sustainable Cities Collective
Cities that turn a blind eye to pockets of blight and violence not only put community members at greater risk, but also put themselves at greater risk for the flight of capital and jobs. This, combined with leveling of populations in many areas, and projected population decline in others, means that cities cannot count on urbanization and rising birthrates to fuel economic development. Companies can and do go ‘city shopping,’ looking for ‘creative’ places that are safe and desirable. Cities that breed cultural diversity as well as opportunity — where the walk to and from work offers spontaneity and chance inspiration — will thrive. 

Kate Stohr on Investing in Cities | Sustainable Cities Collective

Cities that turn a blind eye to pockets of blight and violence not only put community members at greater risk, but also put themselves at greater risk for the flight of capital and jobs. This, combined with leveling of populations in many areas, and projected population decline in others, means that cities cannot count on urbanization and rising birthrates to fuel economic development. Companies can and do go ‘city shopping,’ looking for ‘creative’ places that are safe and desirable. Cities that breed cultural diversity as well as opportunity — where the walk to and from work offers spontaneity and chance inspiration — will thrive. 

artofpowermovie:

The Fight Over Food Deserts: Corporate America Smacks Its Way Down

Seventeen percent of American jobs are in the food system, and those jobs are among the lowest paid in the country. If food industry leaders are serious about improving food access, they need to start by tackling food insecurity where it starts — with sub-poverty wages. No amount of fresh produce will cure America’s food and health gap unless it comes with a commitment to fight its root causes — poverty and inequality. To really fight food deserts, the Obamas should start by supporting living wages for workers and support the food businesses that create true economic development in the communities that need it most.