Smart cities: Do we have what it takes? | Greenbang

Published Wednesday, 17th November 2010

What does it take to build a smarter, more sustainable city? Not surprisingly, the answer depends on the specialty of the organisation you ask.

Ask information technology giant IBM, and the answer you’ll get: more and better IT products and services … LOTS of them, to gain intelligence into how we use everything and where the best efficiency improvements can be made. Pose the same question to the people behind the Transition Network and Transition Towns, on the other hand, and they’ll say the solution has to be largely people-based and local, with each community deciding for itself how it wants to address its energy, transport and resource management challenges.

Go back to another big business, one like Siemens with a wide range of specialties — from lighting to building automation, transport to alternative energy — and you’ll hear that it’ll take a wide range of strategies to build a sustainable future. And a fast-growing relative youngster with grand ambitions like Better Place will  tell you electric cars hold the key to making the most of clean energy and keeping our economy humming.

Read more on Greenbang

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Nissan LEAF Electric Car on the Streets of San Francisco by 2010
San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom today announced that Nissan would be bringing its all-electric LEAF, to the Bay Area market in 2010. Speaking on behalf of the Bay Area Electric Vehicle (EV) Corridor program, Newsom said Nissan will work with San Francisco and the Bay Area to promote and build-out an EV charging infrastructure, including development of a streamlined process for customer installation of charging equipment in their homes.
“Nissan is committed to the San Francisco market and is looking forward to working with the city and others in the partnership to make zero emissions a reality throughout the Bay Area,” said Brian Carolin, senior vice president, sales and marketing for Nissan North America. Piquing the interest of anyone in the Bay Area who is a little EV-curious, Carolin added: “In one year, Nissan LEAF zero-emission vehicles will be driving on the streets of San Francisco.”
Gas 2.0

electricpower:

Nissan LEAF Electric Car on the Streets of San Francisco by 2010

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom today announced that Nissan would be bringing its all-electric LEAF, to the Bay Area market in 2010. Speaking on behalf of the Bay Area Electric Vehicle (EV) Corridor program, Newsom said Nissan will work with San Francisco and the Bay Area to promote and build-out an EV charging infrastructure, including development of a streamlined process for customer installation of charging equipment in their homes.

“Nissan is committed to the San Francisco market and is looking forward to working with the city and others in the partnership to make zero emissions a reality throughout the Bay Area,” said Brian Carolin, senior vice president, sales and marketing for Nissan North America. Piquing the interest of anyone in the Bay Area who is a little EV-curious, Carolin added: “In one year, Nissan LEAF zero-emission vehicles will be driving on the streets of San Francisco.”

Gas 2.0

electricpower:

Quick Spin: Nissan Leaf the tip of mass market EV spear 
Nissan has gone into a back room, pulled out its Ouija board and decided that the time is right to make a huge bet. The Japanese automaker, along with its partner Renault, wants to be the world leader in pure electric vehicles. Even though you can go buy an Altima hybrid right now, the company didn’t develop its own gas-electric technology (the sedan uses Toyota tech). This time around, Nissan believes the future belongs to vehicles without an internal combustion engine (ICE) and is preparing to put its own foot forward. It’s way too early to know for sure, but Nissan’s gamble could pay off handsomely. ToyotaGeneral Motors and others are adding plugs to vehicles with liquid-fueled engines, but no major automaker has claimed the pure EV pole position. If everything goes right, Nissan will be that automaker. The flagship vehicle for the automaker is, of course, the Leaf EV hatchback, which was unveiled in August and recently made its North American debut in Los Angeles. We were on hand to take a Leaf mule out for a short (very short) spin and heard directly from Nissan how this unique-looking EV will secure Nissan’s place in the auto industry as tremendous changes take place in the coming years. Follow us after the jump to learn about Nissan’s wager and find out if the Leaf has got the potential to (silently) propel the company to the top. leads the hybrid race,
Autoblog Green

electricpower:

Quick Spin: Nissan Leaf the tip of mass market EV spear

Nissan has gone into a back room, pulled out its Ouija board and decided that the time is right to make a huge bet. The Japanese automaker, along with its partner Renault, wants to be the world leader in pure electric vehicles. Even though you can go buy an Altima hybrid right now, the company didn’t develop its own gas-electric technology (the sedan uses Toyota tech). This time around, Nissan believes the future belongs to vehicles without an internal combustion engine (ICE) and is preparing to put its own foot forward. It’s way too early to know for sure, but Nissan’s gamble could pay off handsomely. ToyotaGeneral Motors and others are adding plugs to vehicles with liquid-fueled engines, but no major automaker has claimed the pure EV pole position. If everything goes right, Nissan will be that automaker.

The flagship vehicle for the automaker is, of course, the Leaf EV hatchback, which was unveiled in August and recently made its North American debut in Los Angeles. We were on hand to take a Leaf mule out for a short (very short) spin and heard directly from Nissan how this unique-looking EV will secure Nissan’s place in the auto industry as tremendous changes take place in the coming years. Follow us after the jump to learn about Nissan’s wager and find out if the Leaf has got the potential to (silently) propel the company to the top.
leads the hybrid race,

Autoblog Green

electricpower:

Big News: France to Spend $2.2 Billion on Electric Car Charging Stati
Charging Sockets to Become Obligatory in Office Parking Lots €1.5 billion (about $2.2 billion) will be spent by France on the network of EV charging stations, but also “the government will make the installation of charging sockets obligatory in office parking lots by 2015, and new apartment blocks with parking lots will have to include charging stations starting in 2012.”
Via Wall Street Journal
TreeHugger

electricpower:

Big News: France to Spend $2.2 Billion on Electric Car Charging Stati

Charging Sockets to Become Obligatory in Office Parking Lots
€1.5 billion (about $2.2 billion) will be spent by France on the network of EV charging stations, but also “the government will make the installation of charging sockets obligatory in office parking lots by 2015, and new apartment blocks with parking lots will have to include charging stations starting in 2012.”

Via Wall Street Journal

TreeHugger