smartercities:

Volvo Tests A Road That Can Charge Cars And Trucks | FastCompany
Charging electric vehicles while they are on the move may seem a bit out-there. But, in fact, we already do it for major groups of vehicles—trams and trains, for instance. French cities have completely wireless trams, and their record is good. After 10 years and about 7.5 million miles, they haven’t reported serious problems.
In Sweden, Volvo is applying the same technology to roads, opening up the possibility that people would no longer have to fear getting stranded by a dead battery—a major hurdle to people’s willingness to buy an electric car. 

smartercities:

Volvo Tests A Road That Can Charge Cars And Trucks | FastCompany

Charging electric vehicles while they are on the move may seem a bit out-there. But, in fact, we already do it for major groups of vehicles—trams and trains, for instance. French cities have completely wireless trams, and their record is good. After 10 years and about 7.5 million miles, they haven’t reported serious problems.

In Sweden, Volvo is applying the same technology to roads, opening up the possibility that people would no longer have to fear getting stranded by a dead battery—a major hurdle to people’s willingness to buy an electric car. 

Volvo Tests A Road That Can Charge Cars And Trucks | FastCompany
Charging electric vehicles while they are on the move may seem a bit out-there. But, in fact, we already do it for major groups of vehicles—trams and trains, for instance. French cities have completely wireless trams, and their record is good. After 10 years and about 7.5 million miles, they haven’t reported serious problems.
In Sweden, Volvo is applying the same technology to roads, opening up the possibility that people would no longer have to fear getting stranded by a dead battery—a major hurdle to people’s willingness to buy an electric car. 

Volvo Tests A Road That Can Charge Cars And Trucks | FastCompany

Charging electric vehicles while they are on the move may seem a bit out-there. But, in fact, we already do it for major groups of vehicles—trams and trains, for instance. French cities have completely wireless trams, and their record is good. After 10 years and about 7.5 million miles, they haven’t reported serious problems.

In Sweden, Volvo is applying the same technology to roads, opening up the possibility that people would no longer have to fear getting stranded by a dead battery—a major hurdle to people’s willingness to buy an electric car. 

The electric bus that charges when driven | SmartPlanet
The fledgling electric vehicle industry is fraught with problems including so-called ‘range anxiety’ and the long wait for charging at stations, but an EV developed in South Korea could show us a glimpse of future public transport.
The Online Electric Vehicle (OLEV), developed by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), is an electric vehicle that can be charged while stationary or driving — removing the lengthy wait at a charging station between trips.

The electric bus that charges when driven | SmartPlanet

The fledgling electric vehicle industry is fraught with problems including so-called ‘range anxiety’ and the long wait for charging at stations, but an EV developed in South Korea could show us a glimpse of future public transport.

The Online Electric Vehicle (OLEV), developed by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), is an electric vehicle that can be charged while stationary or driving — removing the lengthy wait at a charging station between trips.

ElectriCity — Ultramodern Electric Bus Service Launching In Gothenburg In 2015 | Clean Technica
Buses that are silent, energy efficient, and don’t release exhaust — sounds good, doesn’t it? Just such a bus service is now in development in the Swedish city of Gothenburg — it’s currently set to launch in 2015. The new “ultramodern” bus service will be entirely electric and powered entirely by renewable energy sources.

ElectriCity — Ultramodern Electric Bus Service Launching In Gothenburg In 2015 | Clean Technica

Buses that are silent, energy efficient, and don’t release exhaust — sounds good, doesn’t it? Just such a bus service is now in development in the Swedish city of Gothenburg — it’s currently set to launch in 2015. The new “ultramodern” bus service will be entirely electric and powered entirely by renewable energy sources.

Move Over, Hoverboards: This Bike Lets You Fly | Mashable
A new mode of personal transportation has beat hoverboards to the market: the flying bicycle.
Czech companies Duratec, Technodat and Evektor have created a prototype of a flying electric bicycle. Unlike E.T.’s run-of-the-mill two-wheeler, however, this one looks more like a snow bike.

Move Over, Hoverboards: This Bike Lets You Fly | Mashable

A new mode of personal transportation has beat hoverboards to the market: the flying bicycle.

Czech companies Duratec, Technodat and Evektor have created a prototype of a flying electric bicycle. Unlike E.T.’s run-of-the-mill two-wheeler, however, this one looks more like a snow bike.

Utah Develops Wireless Charging for Buses | ThisBigCity
Breakthroughs in inductive power transfer are promising to transform the prospects for electric buses. In July 2011, the Utah State University (USU) Research Foundation demonstrated a 90% electrical transfer efficiency of 5kW over an air gap of 10 inches. The breakthrough made inductive power transfer viable for buses, potentially minimising pollution in urban centres and saving costs.

Utah Develops Wireless Charging for Buses | ThisBigCity

Breakthroughs in inductive power transfer are promising to transform the prospects for electric buses. In July 2011, the Utah State University (USU) Research Foundation demonstrated a 90% electrical transfer efficiency of 5kW over an air gap of 10 inches. The breakthrough made inductive power transfer viable for buses, potentially minimising pollution in urban centres and saving costs.

Solar Roads, Charging Roads, And The Future Of Transportation | FastCompany
Here are two great innovations, that could potentially have a profound impact on the future of transportation.
Solar Roads: Imagine that you could replace the concrete or asphalt with solar cells beneath a layer of glass. Operating at 15% efficiency the U.S. road system would provide more than four times our current electricity needs, or about as much electricity as the whole world uses. It’s a lot of potential power.
Charging Roads: What if an electric vehicle can be recharged without wires while on road. Using magnetic induction technology, a company called Wave is trying to achieve just that. 

Solar Roads, Charging Roads, And The Future Of Transportation | FastCompany

Here are two great innovations, that could potentially have a profound impact on the future of transportation.

Solar Roads: Imagine that you could replace the concrete or asphalt with solar cells beneath a layer of glass. Operating at 15% efficiency the U.S. road system would provide more than four times our current electricity needs, or about as much electricity as the whole world uses. It’s a lot of potential power.

Charging Roads: What if an electric vehicle can be recharged without wires while on road. Using magnetic induction technology, a company called Wave is trying to achieve just that.