IBM said on Thursday it will open three analytics centers in Europe, part of its growing business analytics business highlighted by its $1.7 billion offer earlier this week for vendor Netezza.

The centers will be in Zurich, Budapest and Vienna, IBM said. Zurich will focus on financial analytics and “Smarter Cities,” an IBM program that uses its technologies to help government improve their city infrastructures. The Budapest center will work on green infrastructure and transportation, while Vienna will focus on energy grids, supply chain optimization and Smarter Cities, IBM said.

cloois:

Road trains that link vehicles together using wireless sensors could soon be on European roads.
A couple of years ago I was talking about an idea like this with my friend, Carlo. I can’t believe it might be happening! Prediction: phase two will involve smart roads that organize their own traffic & provide power.

cloois:

Road trains that link vehicles together using wireless sensors could soon be on European roads.

A couple of years ago I was talking about an idea like this with my friend, Carlo. I can’t believe it might be happening! Prediction: phase two will involve smart roads that organize their own traffic & provide power.

Living Lab is a new concept for R&D and innovation to boost the Lisbon strategy for jobs and growth in Europe. So what are Living Labs? The answer depends on who you ask because of the big differences between running Living Labs. But one thing is common for all of us; the human-centric involvement and its potential for development of new ICT-based services and products. It is all done by bringing different stakeholders together in a co-creative way.

The great cities of Europe, long abuilding, were at once centers of political, commercial, ecclesiastical, and miltary power, and they showed it not just in their finely grained urban fabrics - their plazas, forecourts, esplanades, and galleries - but in the overarching civic consciousness with which buildings and spaces were tied together as an organic whole, reflecting the idea of civilization as a spiritual enterprise.

American cities flourished almost solely as centers for business, and they showed it. Americans omitted to build the ceremonial spaces and public structures that these other functions might have called for. What business required was offices, factories, housing for workers, and little else. Beyond advertising itself, business had a limited interest in decorating the public realm. Profits were for partners and stockholders. Where architectural adornment occurred, it was largely concerned with the treatment of surfaces, not with the creation of public amenity. The use of the space itself, of the real estate, was a foregone conclusion: maximize the building lot, period.