New CityCenter Brings Green Public Space to Downtown D.C. | Sustainable Cities Collective
The 10-acre CityCenterDC,  the largest redevelopment project currently underway in any downtown in  an American city, looks like a people-friendly design. Incorporating  a generous new park and central plaza, along with green roofs and  gardens set within commercial and residential buildings, the development  may present an improved model for how to integrate sustainable design  elements into a major urban redevelopment project. The redevelopment of  the site of the old DC convention center is being led by Hines |  Archstone. Gustafson Guthrie Nichol,  a landscape architecture firm, is creating the site master plan along  with Foster + Partners, and also running the landscape design, working  with DC-based Lee & Associates. Kathryn Gustafson, FASLA, said “in  addition to creating a major new residential and retail hub,  CityCenterDC will create a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood, with park  and walkways.”
According to Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, the design  of the new public spaces were guided by a few core ideas, namely restore  the original DC street grid, limit car access, and create green public  spaces set within mixed-use development. The team recognized the need to  restore L’Enfant’s original plan and “reinstate I Street and 10th  Street, thereby extending the urban fabric of the city;” integrate  the development into the neighborhood by “incorporating small pedestrian  alleyways with limited vehicular access”; and create an “inviting and  exceptional destination featuring signature retail and dining  establishments, engaging public spaces with seasonal programming, and a  mix of housing opportunities.”
Using L’Enfant’s original street  grid as a “framework for a pedestrian-oriented” neighborhood, the  development will include a new Northwest Park and central plaza. “The  centerpiece of Northwest Park are a pair of fountains which frame the  experience of entering the park with the sound of rushing water and a  controlled perspective view of the new neighborhood and the entrance to  Central Plaza. On either side of the fountains, two areas provide a  variety of seating options under a generous canopy of trees.”

New CityCenter Brings Green Public Space to Downtown D.C. | Sustainable Cities Collective

The 10-acre CityCenterDC, the largest redevelopment project currently underway in any downtown in an American city, looks like a people-friendly design. Incorporating a generous new park and central plaza, along with green roofs and gardens set within commercial and residential buildings, the development may present an improved model for how to integrate sustainable design elements into a major urban redevelopment project. The redevelopment of the site of the old DC convention center is being led by Hines | Archstone. Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, a landscape architecture firm, is creating the site master plan along with Foster + Partners, and also running the landscape design, working with DC-based Lee & Associates. Kathryn Gustafson, FASLA, said “in addition to creating a major new residential and retail hub, CityCenterDC will create a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood, with park and walkways.”

According to Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, the design of the new public spaces were guided by a few core ideas, namely restore the original DC street grid, limit car access, and create green public spaces set within mixed-use development. The team recognized the need to restore L’Enfant’s original plan and “reinstate I Street and 10th Street, thereby extending the urban fabric of the city;” integrate the development into the neighborhood by “incorporating small pedestrian alleyways with limited vehicular access”; and create an “inviting and exceptional destination featuring signature retail and dining establishments, engaging public spaces with seasonal programming, and a mix of housing opportunities.”

Using L’Enfant’s original street grid as a “framework for a pedestrian-oriented” neighborhood, the development will include a new Northwest Park and central plaza. “The centerpiece of Northwest Park are a pair of fountains which frame the experience of entering the park with the sound of rushing water and a controlled perspective view of the new neighborhood and the entrance to Central Plaza. On either side of the fountains, two areas provide a variety of seating options under a generous canopy of trees.”

waaayward:

Absolutely amazing project from Marco Castro Cosio:

 
Reclaim forgotten space, increase quality of life and grow the amount of green spaces in the city. 



 
Green roofs and vertical gardens have been used as solution to provide green life to space constrained spaces.
If we grew a garden on the roof of every one of the 4,500 buses in the MTA bus fleet, we would have 35 acres of new rolling green space in the city… The equivalent to Four Bryant Parks.

waaayward:

Absolutely amazing project from Marco Castro Cosio:

Reclaim forgotten space, increase quality of life and grow the amount of green spaces in the city. 

Green roofs and vertical gardens have been used as solution to provide green life to space constrained spaces.

If we grew a garden on the roof of every one of the 4,500 buses in the MTA bus fleet, we would have 35 acres of new rolling green space in the city… The equivalent to Four Bryant Parks.

(via waaayward)

edificecomplex:

This towering eco high-rise offers a green gateway to the city of Chicago that includes a large vertical farm, mixed-use towers, and a residential tower all tied together by a series of sky bridges. Envisioned by a student at the Illinois Institute of Technology, the project is located over Lake Shore Drive and was designed specifically for the location of the dormant Chicago Spire site, otherwise known as the “Giant Hole in the Ground”.

The Chicago Gateway is composed of two vertical mixed-use towers supported by a leaning tower covered in a green roof. Offices and commercial space would reside in the vertical towers and residences in the leaning tower, which bridges over Lake Shore Drive. All of the structures are connected together via a vertical farm podium, and a network of sky bridges connects the towers and provides access to other nearby buildings.

Urban farming via hydroponics would take place inside the green podium, and a green roof would grow additional produce. Vegetables and herbs would be grown in mechanized hanging baskets in the hydroponic farm. Produce from the farm could be delivered via they sky bridges, and the public can access the building and use the elevated routes to travel around the city.

This design, which was created in 2007, was a finalist for the prestigious Schiff Foundation Fellowship.

Read more: Vertical Farm Concept is a Green Gateway for Chicago | Inhabitat 

Seeding the City

mirthandwonder:

Seeding the City - a plan for greening the urban experience - is the latest large scale public art project by artist Eve S. Mosher. Mosher says this project is all about POTENTIAL -potential for community action, potential for more green roof, potential for change. These are small green modules (less than four square feet), but they get people thinking about environmental issues.