New Ventilation System Keeps Buildings Fresh But Warm | ThisBigCity
Most natural ventilation systems introduce fresh air into sealed offices without difficulty in summer. But once temperatures drop below 15°C they are either switched off, or use heaters to warm the cold air – a solution which demands a lot of energy.
Now, a Cambridge University spin-off, Breathing Buildings, thinks it has a better solution. It involves mixing the fresh (but cold) incoming winter air with the interior air. The latter is of course much warmer. Combining the two can produce air which is fresh, but does away with the cold draughts typical of many ventilation systems in winter.

New Ventilation System Keeps Buildings Fresh But Warm | ThisBigCity

Most natural ventilation systems introduce fresh air into sealed offices without difficulty in summer. But once temperatures drop below 15°C they are either switched off, or use heaters to warm the cold air – a solution which demands a lot of energy.

Now, a Cambridge University spin-off, Breathing Buildings, thinks it has a better solution. It involves mixing the fresh (but cold) incoming winter air with the interior air. The latter is of course much warmer. Combining the two can produce air which is fresh, but does away with the cold draughts typical of many ventilation systems in winter.

This High Concentration Photovoltaic Thermal System (HCPVT) can harness the energy of 2,000 suns and provide fresh water and air conditioning in remote locations. The prototype HCPVT system under development uses a large parabolic dish, made from a multitude of mirror facets, which is attached to a tracking system that determines the best angle based on the position of the sun. Once aligned, the sun’s rays reflect off the mirror onto several microchannel-liquid cooled receivers with triple junction photovoltaic chips — each 1x1 centimeter chip can convert 200-250 watts, on average, over a typical eight hour day in a sunny region.
Read more: http://huff.to/11vTQGE

This High Concentration Photovoltaic Thermal System (HCPVT) can harness the energy of 2,000 suns and provide fresh water and air conditioning in remote locations. The prototype HCPVT system under development uses a large parabolic dish, made from a multitude of mirror facets, which is attached to a tracking system that determines the best angle based on the position of the sun. Once aligned, the sun’s rays reflect off the mirror onto several microchannel-liquid cooled receivers with triple junction photovoltaic chips — each 1x1 centimeter chip can convert 200-250 watts, on average, over a typical eight hour day in a sunny region.

Read more: http://huff.to/11vTQGE