CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities Blog » Got a Minute? Give a Minute!

And post your idea on how to make NYC’s neighborhoods greener…in May.
Give a Minute is a web based civil engagement application that allows people to submit ideas about a certain topic.  It acts as a huge digital white board where all ideas are posted on virtual post-its.  Viewers can see these ideas, share them on Facebook, and even organize into virtual ‘action groups’ that allow communities to actually implement some of the suggestions.  If a neighborhood on Staten Island wanted to get a rain barrel system going, they can start planning through these action groups.
Sounds like a good idea?  Mayor Bloomberg certainly thinks so: he’s sponsored Give a Minute as part of his PlaNYC 2030 program which will be released in May.  ”This kind of open call for ideas – or ‘crowdsourcing,’ as it’s called – has helped cutting-edge companies like Facebook and Netflix improve services and save money.  And with more than 8.4 million people in our crowd, imagine what we can come up with.”  In fact, if Mayor Bloomberg sees an idea on the virtual board that he likes, he can even endorse that idea and potentially contact the person(s) who suggested it.
Give a Minute was created its first virtual suggestion board in Chicago.  Local Projects, the group that created and streamlined this web application, asked for suggestions on ways to encourage use of public transit in Chicago.  To date, there have been at least 2,000 responses, ideas, and suggestions on how best to address the transit issue in Chicago.
When Give A Minute’s online suggestion box opens to New York this coming May, the question is “Hey NYC, what can we do to green our neighborhoods?”
You can be sure that New Yorkers will have a lot of answers.

CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities Blog » Got a Minute? Give a Minute!

And post your idea on how to make NYC’s neighborhoods greener…in May.

Give a Minute is a web based civil engagement application that allows people to submit ideas about a certain topic.  It acts as a huge digital white board where all ideas are posted on virtual post-its.  Viewers can see these ideas, share them on Facebook, and even organize into virtual ‘action groups’ that allow communities to actually implement some of the suggestions.  If a neighborhood on Staten Island wanted to get a rain barrel system going, they can start planning through these action groups.

Sounds like a good idea?  Mayor Bloomberg certainly thinks so: he’s sponsored Give a Minute as part of his PlaNYC 2030 program which will be released in May.  ”This kind of open call for ideas – or ‘crowdsourcing,’ as it’s called – has helped cutting-edge companies like Facebook and Netflix improve services and save money.  And with more than 8.4 million people in our crowd, imagine what we can come up with.”  In fact, if Mayor Bloomberg sees an idea on the virtual board that he likes, he can even endorse that idea and potentially contact the person(s) who suggested it.

Give a Minute was created its first virtual suggestion board in Chicago.  Local Projects, the group that created and streamlined this web application, asked for suggestions on ways to encourage use of public transit in Chicago.  To date, there have been at least 2,000 responses, ideas, and suggestions on how best to address the transit issue in Chicago.

When Give A Minute’s online suggestion box opens to New York this coming May, the question is “Hey NYC, what can we do to green our neighborhoods?”

You can be sure that New Yorkers will have a lot of answers.