archresearch:

Devotees carry a statue of the Hindu elephant god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, for immersion in the sea on the last day of “Ganesh Chaturthi” in Mumbai September 3, 2009. Clay statues of Ganesh are made two to three months before the day of “Ganesh Chaturthi”, a popular religious festival in India. The idols are taken through the streets in a procession accompanied by dancing and singing, to be immersed in a river or the sea symbolizing a ritual see-off of his journey towards his abode in “Kailash”, while taking away with him the misfortunes of all mankind. (REUTERS/Punit Paranjpe) #
From a book I’m reading, they talk about the Kinetic City, or the informal: 
“Architecture is not the spectacle of the city, nor does it even comprise the single dominant image of the city.” 
The festival becomes the spectacle, transforming space and people temporarily, creating delight and celebration.
[via BIG PICTURE]
[Article: Negotiating the Static and Kinetic City, by Rahul Mehrotra, 2008]

archresearch:

Devotees carry a statue of the Hindu elephant god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, for immersion in the sea on the last day of “Ganesh Chaturthi” in Mumbai September 3, 2009. Clay statues of Ganesh are made two to three months before the day of “Ganesh Chaturthi”, a popular religious festival in India. The idols are taken through the streets in a procession accompanied by dancing and singing, to be immersed in a river or the sea symbolizing a ritual see-off of his journey towards his abode in “Kailash”, while taking away with him the misfortunes of all mankind. (REUTERS/Punit Paranjpe) #

From a book I’m reading, they talk about the Kinetic City, or the informal:

“Architecture is not the spectacle of the city, nor does it even comprise the single dominant image of the city.”

The festival becomes the spectacle, transforming space and people temporarily, creating delight and celebration.

[via BIG PICTURE]

[Article: Negotiating the Static and Kinetic City, by Rahul Mehrotra, 2008]