When commuting in Mumbai, bring your smartphone | TheCityFix
Carpooling is not a new idea. In order to save money, reduce congestion, or simply use a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane, friends and neighbors have been sharing rides for a long time.
For a country like India, which is expected to become the most populous country in the world by 2025, and for which the number of cars on the road grows every year, solutions like car sharing can’t come too soon. As smartphone penetration increases across India, the solution to gridlocked traffic may lie in apps and other new technologies.
Metershare, a new app developed by students in Mumbai, India, takes ridesharing to the next level, encouraging strangers going the same direction to meet up in order to share a taxi or an auto-rickshaw. By encouraging users to share something other than a personal car, the app offers a solution to Mumbai’s congested streets.

When commuting in Mumbai, bring your smartphone | TheCityFix

Carpooling is not a new idea. In order to save money, reduce congestion, or simply use a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane, friends and neighbors have been sharing rides for a long time.

For a country like India, which is expected to become the most populous country in the world by 2025, and for which the number of cars on the road grows every year, solutions like car sharing can’t come too soon. As smartphone penetration increases across India, the solution to gridlocked traffic may lie in apps and other new technologies.

Metershare, a new app developed by students in Mumbai, India, takes ridesharing to the next level, encouraging strangers going the same direction to meet up in order to share a taxi or an auto-rickshaw. By encouraging users to share something other than a personal car, the app offers a solution to Mumbai’s congested streets.

Namaste Tower: A Welcoming Gesture Of Green Design | Earth Techling
Looking more like a giant sculpture than a working skyscraper, the Namaste Tower currently under construction in Mumbai, India, is expected to be as green as it is beautiful to behold. The building will also incorporate a renewable energy system to help produce hot water, abundant greenery in the common areas and several passive systems to help reduce energy demands.

Namaste Tower: A Welcoming Gesture Of Green Design | Earth Techling

Looking more like a giant sculpture than a working skyscraper, the Namaste Tower currently under construction in Mumbai, India, is expected to be as green as it is beautiful to behold. The building will also incorporate a renewable energy system to help produce hot water, abundant greenery in the common areas and several passive systems to help reduce energy demands.

What Matters: In the markets of the meta city | McKinsey
But as fast as Lagos is growing, it’s actually just a part of a larger urban complex. The world is moving beyond mega-cities to meta-cities. According to the United Nations’ 2010/2011 State of the World’s Cities report, these cities of the future will not be single political entities but will sprawl across geographic, regional, and national boundaries. Consider: Ibadan-Lagos-Accra: This jagged 600-kilometer (373-mile) growing agglomeration of cities snakes through four countries—Nigeria, Benin, Togo, and Ghana—and comprises the economic engine of West Africa. Bangkok: The UN predicts that it will sprawl an additional 200 kilometers (124 miles) from its current center over the next ten years. Hong Kong-Shenzhen-Guangzhou: This region in South China is already home to 120 million people and a massive manufacturing base. Mumbai-Delhi: A 1500-kilometer (932-mile) Indian industrial corridor is now developing between these two cities. 

What Matters: In the markets of the meta city | McKinsey

But as fast as Lagos is growing, it’s actually just a part of a larger urban complex. The world is moving beyond mega-cities to meta-cities. According to the United Nations’ 2010/2011 State of the World’s Cities report, these cities of the future will not be single political entities but will sprawl across geographic, regional, and national boundaries. Consider: Ibadan-Lagos-Accra: This jagged 600-kilometer (373-mile) growing agglomeration of cities snakes through four countries—Nigeria, Benin, Togo, and Ghana—and comprises the economic engine of West Africa. Bangkok: The UN predicts that it will sprawl an additional 200 kilometers (124 miles) from its current center over the next ten years. Hong Kong-Shenzhen-Guangzhou: This region in South China is already home to 120 million people and a massive manufacturing base. Mumbai-Delhi: A 1500-kilometer (932-mile) Indian industrial corridor is now developing between these two cities. 

archresearch:

Devotees carry a statue of the Hindu elephant god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, for immersion in the sea on the last day of “Ganesh Chaturthi” in Mumbai September 3, 2009. Clay statues of Ganesh are made two to three months before the day of “Ganesh Chaturthi”, a popular religious festival in India. The idols are taken through the streets in a procession accompanied by dancing and singing, to be immersed in a river or the sea symbolizing a ritual see-off of his journey towards his abode in “Kailash”, while taking away with him the misfortunes of all mankind. (REUTERS/Punit Paranjpe) #
From a book I’m reading, they talk about the Kinetic City, or the informal: 
“Architecture is not the spectacle of the city, nor does it even comprise the single dominant image of the city.” 
The festival becomes the spectacle, transforming space and people temporarily, creating delight and celebration.
[via BIG PICTURE]
[Article: Negotiating the Static and Kinetic City, by Rahul Mehrotra, 2008]

archresearch:

Devotees carry a statue of the Hindu elephant god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, for immersion in the sea on the last day of “Ganesh Chaturthi” in Mumbai September 3, 2009. Clay statues of Ganesh are made two to three months before the day of “Ganesh Chaturthi”, a popular religious festival in India. The idols are taken through the streets in a procession accompanied by dancing and singing, to be immersed in a river or the sea symbolizing a ritual see-off of his journey towards his abode in “Kailash”, while taking away with him the misfortunes of all mankind. (REUTERS/Punit Paranjpe) #

From a book I’m reading, they talk about the Kinetic City, or the informal:

“Architecture is not the spectacle of the city, nor does it even comprise the single dominant image of the city.”

The festival becomes the spectacle, transforming space and people temporarily, creating delight and celebration.

[via BIG PICTURE]

[Article: Negotiating the Static and Kinetic City, by Rahul Mehrotra, 2008]