Open Data’s Road to Better Transit | Government Technology
Data is everywhere. It now costs less to capture, store and process data than ever before, thanks to better technology and economies of scale. And more than ever, the public expects government to use data to improve its services. Increasingly, government’s problem is not capturing the data, but having sufficient resources to clean and analyze the information in order to address issues, improve performance and make informed decisions.

Open Data’s Road to Better Transit | Government Technology

Data is everywhere. It now costs less to capture, store and process data than ever before, thanks to better technology and economies of scale. And more than ever, the public expects government to use data to improve its services. Increasingly, government’s problem is not capturing the data, but having sufficient resources to clean and analyze the information in order to address issues, improve performance and make informed decisions.

Dublin Digs Deep with City Data | Navigant Research Blog
Cities that want to take advantage of new technologies to improve their operations should be ready to embrace both top-down investment in new management and control systems and bottom-up innovation from a wide range of stakeholders.  Dublin provides a good example of a city that is taking advantage of both approaches to attack some critical city issues.

Dublin Digs Deep with City Data | Navigant Research Blog

Cities that want to take advantage of new technologies to improve their operations should be ready to embrace both top-down investment in new management and control systems and bottom-up innovation from a wide range of stakeholders.  Dublin provides a good example of a city that is taking advantage of both approaches to attack some critical city issues.

When Governments Go Social, Positive Citizen Experiences Can Follow | A Smarter Planet Blog
Today a growing number of cities and counties are embracing social technologies to create “Smart Communities.” According to the World Foundation for Smart Communities, these are communities that make a “conscious effort to use information technology to transform life and work within a region in significant and fundamental, rather than incremental, ways. This transformation is beneficial to the community and attracts local participation and cooperation among community groups, government, business and education.”

When Governments Go Social, Positive Citizen Experiences Can Follow | A Smarter Planet Blog

Today a growing number of cities and counties are embracing social technologies to create “Smart Communities.” According to the World Foundation for Smart Communities, these are communities that make a “conscious effort to use information technology to transform life and work within a region in significant and fundamental, rather than incremental, ways. This transformation is beneficial to the community and attracts local participation and cooperation among community groups, government, business and education.”

African Bus Routes Redrawn Using Cell-Phone Data | MIT Technology Review
Researchers at IBM, using movement data collected from millions of cell-phone users in Ivory Coast in West Africa, have developed a new model for optimizing an urban transportation system.

The IBM model prescribed changes in bus routes around the around Abidjan, the nation’s largest city. These changes—based on people’s movements as discerned from cell-phone records—could, in theory, slash travel times 10 percent.

African Bus Routes Redrawn Using Cell-Phone Data | MIT Technology Review

Researchers at IBM, using movement data collected from millions of cell-phone users in Ivory Coast in West Africa, have developed a new model for optimizing an urban transportation system.

The IBM model prescribed changes in bus routes around the around Abidjan, the nation’s largest city. These changes—based on people’s movements as discerned from cell-phone records—could, in theory, slash travel times 10 percent.

Cities are finding useful ways of handling a torrent of data | The Economist
Many cities around the country are accumulating data faster than they know what to do with. One approach is to give them to the public. For example, San Francisco, New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago are or soon will be sharing the grades that health inspectors give to restaurants with an online restaurant directory.

Cities are finding useful ways of handling a torrent of data | The Economist

Many cities around the country are accumulating data faster than they know what to do with. One approach is to give them to the public. For example, San Francisco, New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago are or soon will be sharing the grades that health inspectors give to restaurants with an online restaurant directory.

Creating a More Efficient Streamlined Government with Citizen Collaboration | Citizen IBM 

The ever-growing pace of urbanization brings many challenges to government organizations, including increased demands for services with reduced sources of revenue, and calls for more accountability, openness and transparency. Forward thinking public sector leaders know that they can – and must – convene the right people, technologies and strategies to support growth and prosperity. Simultaneously, they also must ensure a safe and healthy environment in which their citizens may enjoy a high quality of life.

Enabling growth and prosperity requires collaboration – across boundaries and among organizations and departments – in ways that might have been previously unthinkable. Technological improvements are enabling governments to share not only big machines like backhoes and emergency vehicles, but also services, big data analytics and computing capabilities.