Data Makes Dubuque, Iowa Smart and Sustainable | Government Technology
Data is an intangible and powerful tool, the city of Dubuque, Iowa, discovered over the past few years. The city partnered with IBM Research in 2009 to create an initiative called Smarter Sustainable Dubuque. Aligned with Mayor Roy Buol’s platform of engaging citizens as partners, Smarter Sustainable Dubuque has deployed several pilot programs aimed at encouraging sustainable practices. The city now more closely monitors utility and transportation data, shares that data with its population, and reaps the benefits of smarter decision-making.

Data Makes Dubuque, Iowa Smart and Sustainable | Government Technology

Data is an intangible and powerful tool, the city of Dubuque, Iowa, discovered over the past few years. The city partnered with IBM Research in 2009 to create an initiative called Smarter Sustainable Dubuque. Aligned with Mayor Roy Buol’s platform of engaging citizens as partners, Smarter Sustainable Dubuque has deployed several pilot programs aimed at encouraging sustainable practices. The city now more closely monitors utility and transportation data, shares that data with its population, and reaps the benefits of smarter decision-making.

Cities are finding useful ways of handling a torrent of data | The Economist
Many cities around the country are accumulating data faster than they know what to do with. One approach is to give them to the public. For example, San Francisco, New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago are or soon will be sharing the grades that health inspectors give to restaurants with an online restaurant directory.

Cities are finding useful ways of handling a torrent of data | The Economist

Many cities around the country are accumulating data faster than they know what to do with. One approach is to give them to the public. For example, San Francisco, New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago are or soon will be sharing the grades that health inspectors give to restaurants with an online restaurant directory.

New York Turns to Wikis to Encourage Transparency, Engagement – Next American City
Credit: Flickr user justgrimes
VIA THE NEW YORK WORLD
Last Tuesday, New York City took a double leap into the future of open government. TheDepartment of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) released preliminary policies, technical standards and guidelines under the new Local Law 11, which requires city agencies to publish all public data in one online portal in a machine-readable format.
And it did so in the form of a wiki, an interactive document that enables any registered user to add to or amend the draft policies, so the public and city agencies can literally write in their own version of what they think the new rules should be. All revisions are saved under a page’s “history” tab so changes are recorded.
Think of it as Wikipedia for government. As far as anyone can recall, the wiki is the first of its kind for a city administration.
The wiki format, said, DoITT’s director of research and development Andrew Nicklin, “is an attempt to drive things in an interactive and iterative manner. Why pass a Word doc around when we can all make changes collaboratively?” The process also lets the agencies that will be answerable to the new law be a part of the conversation, he said.
The wiki will be open for comments for the next couple of months, at which point DoITT staff will compile the input, review it internally and issue final data standards in September.

New York Turns to Wikis to Encourage Transparency, Engagement – Next American City

Credit: Flickr user justgrimes

VIA THE NEW YORK WORLD

Last Tuesday, New York City took a double leap into the future of open government. TheDepartment of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) released preliminary policies, technical standards and guidelines under the new Local Law 11, which requires city agencies to publish all public data in one online portal in a machine-readable format.

And it did so in the form of a wiki, an interactive document that enables any registered user to add to or amend the draft policies, so the public and city agencies can literally write in their own version of what they think the new rules should be. All revisions are saved under a page’s “history” tab so changes are recorded.

Think of it as Wikipedia for government. As far as anyone can recall, the wiki is the first of its kind for a city administration.

The wiki format, said, DoITT’s director of research and development Andrew Nicklin, “is an attempt to drive things in an interactive and iterative manner. Why pass a Word doc around when we can all make changes collaboratively?” The process also lets the agencies that will be answerable to the new law be a part of the conversation, he said.

The wiki will be open for comments for the next couple of months, at which point DoITT staff will compile the input, review it internally and issue final data standards in September.

opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.
Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!
The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right
…
Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.
Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.

opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.

Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!

The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right

Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.

Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.

(via smarterplanet)