Turning Waste Plastic into Social Improvements | ThisBigCity
Plastic pollution is quite literally an ever-growing problem. Waste bottles, bags and packaging can be seen littering most urban environments – but unlike other forms of waste, they can take anything from 50 to 1,000,000 years to decompose.
A new scheme aims to encourage people living in impoverished regions to tackle the problem. Plastic collected from homes or common littering sites, such as beaches, will be exchangeable at a ‘Plastic Bank’ for goods, 3D printed products (made from the plastic the bank recycles) and micro-finance loans. A pilot of the scheme is being launched in Lima (where only 2% of plastic waste gets recycled), Peru, next year, with plans to open Plastic Banks worldwide if it is successful.

Turning Waste Plastic into Social Improvements | ThisBigCity

Plastic pollution is quite literally an ever-growing problem. Waste bottles, bags and packaging can be seen littering most urban environments – but unlike other forms of waste, they can take anything from 50 to 1,000,000 years to decompose.

A new scheme aims to encourage people living in impoverished regions to tackle the problem. Plastic collected from homes or common littering sites, such as beaches, will be exchangeable at a ‘Plastic Bank’ for goods, 3D printed products (made from the plastic the bank recycles) and micro-finance loans. A pilot of the scheme is being launched in Lima (where only 2% of plastic waste gets recycled), Peru, next year, with plans to open Plastic Banks worldwide if it is successful.

chrbutler:

Great idea!
I can’t fathom a better way to reduce waste created by plastic bags and other packaging than by eschewing the stuff altogether, which is precisely what London’s Unpackagedgrocery shop does.
Beginning life as a market stall in 2006, Unpackaged is a unique and brilliant concept that is so simple it hurts, especially considering the sheer amount of packaging waste that is ridiculously filling our planet’s landfill sites. Within the beautifully designed shop, organic whole foods, dried fruit, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, even refillable oils, vinegars and wines are all available to place straight into your own containers, that you will have brought along with you … if you haven’t then reusable bags are available.

chrbutler:

Great idea!

I can’t fathom a better way to reduce waste created by plastic bags and other packaging than by eschewing the stuff altogether, which is precisely what London’s Unpackagedgrocery shop does.
Beginning life as a market stall in 2006, Unpackaged is a unique and brilliant concept that is so simple it hurts, especially considering the sheer amount of packaging waste that is ridiculously filling our planet’s landfill sites. Within the beautifully designed shop, organic whole foods, dried fruit, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, even refillable oils, vinegars and wines are all available to place straight into your own containers, that you will have brought along with you … if you haven’t then reusable bags are available.
electricpower:

Konarka’s Power Plastic Turns Buildings into Power Plants 
Solar energy innovator Konarka is out to prove that you can have your sustainable cake and eat it, too.  The Massachusetts-based company has launched a pilot project that will integrate its proprietary Power Plastic solar panels into the non-loadbearing exterior wall of a building, called acurtain wall. The new design makes solar energy a seamless part of the building rather than an afterthought.
The solar energy curtain wall project will be constructed in Tamarac, Florida, at an office building owned by Arch Aluminum & Glass Co., Inc. Arch and Konarka have teamed up to demonstrate that an active solar glass wall could enable the structure of a building to generate sustainable energy for its internal operations.  For now the partners appear to be focused on commercial and industrial applications, but if the curtain wall proves cost-effective it could also open the door for integrated solar panels in a wide range of residential and institutional structures.
CleanTechnica

electricpower:

Konarka’s Power Plastic Turns Buildings into Power Plants

Solar energy innovator Konarka is out to prove that you can have your sustainable cake and eat it, too.  The Massachusetts-based company has launched a pilot project that will integrate its proprietary Power Plastic solar panels into the non-loadbearing exterior wall of a building, called acurtain wall. The new design makes solar energy a seamless part of the building rather than an afterthought.

The solar energy curtain wall project will be constructed in Tamarac, Florida, at an office building owned by Arch Aluminum & Glass Co., Inc. Arch and Konarka have teamed up to demonstrate that an active solar glass wall could enable the structure of a building to generate sustainable energy for its internal operations.  For now the partners appear to be focused on commercial and industrial applications, but if the curtain wall proves cost-effective it could also open the door for integrated solar panels in a wide range of residential and institutional structures.

CleanTechnica