Last night, Mayor Bloomberg announced the winners of NYC BigApps 3.0, the third annual competition for software developers and members of the public to create web or mobile applications using official City data. A total of 11 winning applications were selected from a record 96 eligible applications that were submitted for this year’s contest. The NYC BigApps 3.0 winners are:

Best Overall Application

  • Grand Prize: NYCFacets - seeks to streamline and simplify the process for accessing, understanding, and utilizing the tremendous amount of data available in City’s NYC Open Data site.
  • Second Prize: Work+ - helps New Yorkers who traditionally work from home find nearby locations to work in their communities.

Popular Choice Award

  • Grand Prize: New York Trip Builder - a travel site that helps users personalize a trip in just a few quick steps.
  • Second Prize: Scene Near Me - provides alerts when users are near legendary New York City movie scenes. 

Investor’s Choice Award

  • The Funday Genie - an application designed to help users plan a free day in New York City.

Best Mobility App

  • Embark NYC - an application designed to make taking the subway simple.

Best Green App

  • 596 Acres - a public education project aimed at making communities in Brooklyn aware of the land resources around them.

Best Education App

  • Sage: Pre-K and Elementary Schools Search - a mobile application that enables parents to search by location for nearby NYC public Pre-K and elementary schools.

Best Health & Safety App

  • TestFlip.com Personal Safety App (Lite) for NYC - a personal emergency web mobile application which helps alert the nearest Police Precinct, provides a custom emergency phone number by SMS or provides a pre-scripted voice message or a custom email by simply pressing one Emergency Button. 

Best NYC Mashup

  • Work+

Best Student Award

  • ParkAlly - an application which simplifies the search for available parking spots and eliminates the inconveniences associated with parking in heavily populated areas.

City Talent Award

  • Uhpartments - provides building maintenance reports for those users seeking apartments.

First launched in 2009 as part of the City’s ongoing efforts to increase transparency in government, as well as to improve the quality of life for New Yorkers and visitors, BigApps has grown each year and this year included more than 230 new datasets from more than 60 City agencies, commissions, and Business Improvement Districts, for a total of nearly 750 available data sets for developers.

Check out all the winning apps and read much more in the official press release. Congratulations to all who participated in this year’s competition!

via nycedc:

(via nycdigital)

opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.
Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!
The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right
…
Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.
Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.

opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.

Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!

The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right

Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.

Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.

(via smarterplanet)