Better use of public safety data can revive local economies | The Guardian
More efficient use of data can improve safety and security, making communities more attractive places to live and do business. Politicians and citizens alike consistently rank safety and security as a high priority. Good policing, emergency services and disaster response plans help communities to thrive and develop, and in a time of economic recovery can have a significant impact on citizens’ wellbeing.

Better use of public safety data can revive local economies | The Guardian

More efficient use of data can improve safety and security, making communities more attractive places to live and do business. Politicians and citizens alike consistently rank safety and security as a high priority. Good policing, emergency services and disaster response plans help communities to thrive and develop, and in a time of economic recovery can have a significant impact on citizens’ wellbeing.

Using Data to Keep Peace | The Atlantic
There is no proverbial silver bullet to creating a safer city, but analytics technology is assisting law-enforcement agencies all over the world to sort through information—part of the 2.5 quintillion bytes of data we create and consume every day—to get ahead of crime. Having access to all that information is an invaluable resource for law enforcement agencies, but it can also be pretty paralyzing. After all, only a fraction of the bits and bytes can actually be relevant, right? But how do you know, and, more importantly, how do you find and act on it?
Read more

Using Data to Keep Peace | The Atlantic

There is no proverbial silver bullet to creating a safer city, but analytics technology is assisting law-enforcement agencies all over the world to sort through information—part of the 2.5 quintillion bytes of data we create and consume every day—to get ahead of crime. Having access to all that information is an invaluable resource for law enforcement agencies, but it can also be pretty paralyzing. After all, only a fraction of the bits and bytes can actually be relevant, right? But how do you know, and, more importantly, how do you find and act on it?

Read more

IBM Smarter Cities Challenge: About the Challenge: Johannesburg, South Africa
In Johannesburg, the IBM team developed a five-year public safety strategy in line with the city’s 2040 vision of a smart city. During the three-week project, the team conducted an intensive review of existing initiatives and operations — key resource challenges, such as funding, expertise, and inconsistent business community support were identified, along with execution challenges and structural challenges. Five key safety elements were identified together with details of how crime prevention and investigation, asset management and infrastructure safety, crisis and emergency response, community education and engagement, and governance and integrated intelligence would integrate into a single roadmap for comprehensive community safety.

IBM Smarter Cities Challenge: About the Challenge: Johannesburg, South Africa

In Johannesburg, the IBM team developed a five-year public safety strategy in line with the city’s 2040 vision of a smart city. During the three-week project, the team conducted an intensive review of existing initiatives and operations — key resource challenges, such as funding, expertise, and inconsistent business community support were identified, along with execution challenges and structural challenges. Five key safety elements were identified together with details of how crime prevention and investigation, asset management and infrastructure safety, crisis and emergency response, community education and engagement, and governance and integrated intelligence would integrate into a single roadmap for comprehensive community safety.

City-wide sensor system could make cities run more smoothly
(PhysOrg.com) — By installing millions of sensors throughout a  city and hooking them up to an urban operating system, the  Portuguese-based company Living PlanIT envisions that, in the future,  cities could monitor and manage themselves more efficiently without the  need for additional human supervision.
For instance, in the event of a fire in an occupied building, sensors  would spot the fire and then flickering lights and alarms would direct  people to a safe stairwell and an exit. At the same time, a fire station would be notified and the system would manage the traffic lights so fire engines could reach the building as quickly as possible.
In this way and others, sensors around the city could keep an eye on what’s happening and keep things running smoothly.  The plan involves using sensors for monitoring everything from traffic  flow, energy consumption, water use, waste processing, and the  temperature of individual rooms. All these sensors would be connected to  the Urban OS, enabling them to communicate with each other. The Urban  OS was developed by McLaren Electronic Systems, which makes sensors for Formula One cars.
According to Living PlanIT, this kind of “smart city” could lead to  cost savings while improving the quality of life for the people who live  there. The company is currently building a demo city called PlanIT  Valley, located in southern Portugal near the town of Paredes. Although  it will take several years for the city to be built, Living PlanIT hopes  that the final outcome will be a city that is more environmentally,  socially, and economically sustainable than today’s cities.

City-wide sensor system could make cities run more smoothly

(PhysOrg.com) — By installing millions of sensors throughout a city and hooking them up to an urban operating system, the Portuguese-based company Living PlanIT envisions that, in the future, cities could monitor and manage themselves more efficiently without the need for additional human supervision.

For instance, in the event of a fire in an occupied building, sensors would spot the fire and then flickering lights and alarms would direct people to a safe stairwell and an exit. At the same time, a fire station would be notified and the system would manage the traffic lights so fire engines could reach the building as quickly as possible.

In this way and others, sensors around the city could keep an eye on what’s happening and keep things running smoothly. The plan involves using sensors for monitoring everything from traffic flow, energy consumption, water use, waste processing, and the temperature of individual rooms. All these sensors would be connected to the Urban OS, enabling them to communicate with each other. The Urban OS was developed by McLaren Electronic Systems, which makes sensors for Formula One cars.

According to Living PlanIT, this kind of “smart city” could lead to cost savings while improving the quality of life for the people who live there. The company is currently building a demo city called PlanIT Valley, located in southern Portugal near the town of Paredes. Although it will take several years for the city to be built, Living PlanIT hopes that the final outcome will be a city that is more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable than today’s cities.

New Yorkers:

NYC.gov is back up and running and is optimized for heavy traffic with essential information about Hurricane Irene on the homepage.

You can also get breaking updates by following @NYCMayorsOffice and @NotifyNYC on Twitter and going to the Office of Emergency Management’s Facebook page, all of which will be updated throughout the weekend and accessible if NYC.gov experiences downtime.

nycdigital:

(via smarterplanet)

theatlantic:

America’s 11 Most Walkable Cities:

After evaluating applicant communities in several categories related to  walking—including safety, mobility, access and comfort—the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center last week announced the selection of 11 Walk Friendly Communities across the U.S. They are ranked in categories of achievement
Eight additional communities received honorable mentions. Walk Friendly Communities is a new, national recognition program developed to encourage towns and  cities across the U.S. to make safer  walking environments a priority.  Regular readers know that I write a lot about  walkability, because it expresses so many things we look for in  sustainable places:  health and fitness, a richness of destinations  within walking distance, street connectivity, sidewalks, even a sense of  community and place.  A neighborhood or community whose residents,  workers, and visitors find it useful, convenient, safe, and pleasant to  walk, and do so regularly, is likely to be environmentally friendly in  other ways as well.

Read more about the 11 best cities at The Atlantic.

theatlantic:

America’s 11 Most Walkable Cities:

After evaluating applicant communities in several categories related to walking—including safety, mobility, access and comfort—the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center last week announced the selection of 11 Walk Friendly Communities across the U.S. They are ranked in categories of achievement

Eight additional communities received honorable mentions.

Walk Friendly Communities is a new, national recognition program developed to encourage towns and cities across the U.S. to make safer walking environments a priority. Regular readers know that I write a lot about walkability, because it expresses so many things we look for in sustainable places: health and fitness, a richness of destinations within walking distance, street connectivity, sidewalks, even a sense of community and place. A neighborhood or community whose residents, workers, and visitors find it useful, convenient, safe, and pleasant to walk, and do so regularly, is likely to be environmentally friendly in other ways as well.

Read more about the 11 best cities at The Atlantic.