Let’s Embed Mobile Sensors in Cars to Avoid Traffic | The Atlantic
The next time you’re sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic on a highway, think about how we need to make smarter decisions about how we manage traffic. The technology exists — if it’s used in the right way — to decrease traffic backups. But you can’t solve traffic problems until you understand them.

Let’s Embed Mobile Sensors in Cars to Avoid Traffic | The Atlantic

The next time you’re sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic on a highway, think about how we need to make smarter decisions about how we manage traffic. The technology exists — if it’s used in the right way — to decrease traffic backups. But you can’t solve traffic problems until you understand them.

How the “Internet of Things” May Change the World | National Geographic
The Internet of things is a concept that aims to extend the benefits of the regular Internet—constant connectivity, remote control ability, data sharing, and so on—to goods in the physical world. Foodstuffs, electronics, appliances, collectibles: All would be tied to local and global networks through embedded sensors that are “always on.”

How the “Internet of Things” May Change the World | National Geographic

The Internet of things is a concept that aims to extend the benefits of the regular Internet—constant connectivity, remote control ability, data sharing, and so on—to goods in the physical world. Foodstuffs, electronics, appliances, collectibles: All would be tied to local and global networks through embedded sensors that are “always on.”

How Data is Transforming the Way We Live 

Whether big or small, centuries old or relative newborns, cities around the world face a growing number of challenges, from aging infrastructure, to insufficient transportation, and skyrocketing healthcare costs. Many cities are finding that many of the conventional fixes they’ve long relied on are becoming too costly, too slow or too ineffective to sustain. 

Information-based solutions are emerging as a necessary alternative that are truly impacting the lives of citizens. By working with virtual tools such as big data, analytics, and forecasting, cities are discovering they can solve real problems, faster and cheaper than ever before. This approach is winning out thanks to the maturation and convergence of three technologies: 

  • Smarter devices: From low-cost digital instruments to everyday smart phones, sensors are becoming ubiquitous, making it easier to capture everything from blood pressure readings to pothole locations.
  • Smarter networks: Be it smart grids, wireless networks or speed-of-light fiber optics, pervasive inter-connectivity is making it easier and less costly than ever before to harness and share the resultant gushes of data. 
  • Smarter analytics: Intelligent software and advanced computing technologies are, for the first time ever, able to sort through these gargantuan streams of data faster than ever and deliver actionable findings when and where they’re needed most.
Creating a Global Model for Protecting One of the World’s Natural Wonders | A Smarter Planer Blog
The Jefferson Project at Lake George, being launched today in Upstate New York, is the culmination of a generation’s work to understand the lake’s changing water quality and what it will take to protect it for the next generation.

Creating a Global Model for Protecting One of the World’s Natural Wonders | A Smarter Planer Blog

The Jefferson Project at Lake George, being launched today in Upstate New York, is the culmination of a generation’s work to understand the lake’s changing water quality and what it will take to protect it for the next generation.

Algorithms Can Predict Future Disasters | Wired
California is studded with a network of sensors that can perceive almost any motion in the ground, including the slightest perturbation of the Earth’s crust. The network began as a seismology research project, to track earthquakes in this fault-ridden part of the world. But as technologies developed, the network became more sophisticated, gathering far more data than ever before. Eventually, the science of earthquake observation reached a tipping point, and became the science of earthquake prediction.

Algorithms Can Predict Future Disasters | Wired

California is studded with a network of sensors that can perceive almost any motion in the ground, including the slightest perturbation of the Earth’s crust. The network began as a seismology research project, to track earthquakes in this fault-ridden part of the world. But as technologies developed, the network became more sophisticated, gathering far more data than ever before. Eventually, the science of earthquake observation reached a tipping point, and became the science of earthquake prediction.

Santander: Test bed for smart cities and open data policies | SmartPlanet
To support SmartSantander ambitions, the city is deploying more than 10,000 sensors to monitor everything from garbage collection to crime to air quality. Libelium, a Spanish startup, has contributed around 1,000 sensor nodes, which monitor available street parking (see sensor embedded in street, in image above), collect air quality data and manage street lighting for better energy efficiency.

Santander: Test bed for smart cities and open data policies | SmartPlanet

To support SmartSantander ambitions, the city is deploying more than 10,000 sensors to monitor everything from garbage collection to crime to air quality. Libelium, a Spanish startup, has contributed around 1,000 sensor nodes, which monitor available street parking (see sensor embedded in street, in image above), collect air quality data and manage street lighting for better energy efficiency.

Making Smarter Cities By Making Smarter Systems | Co.Exist
A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.
The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.
The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.
By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.
What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.
People are Sensors
Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.
With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.

Making Smarter Cities By Making Smarter Systems | Co.Exist

A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.

The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.

The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.

By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.

What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.

People are Sensors

Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.

With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.