China has 8 cities with bigger bike share systems than all of America | Vox
The growth of bike share programs is gaining momentum in the US. But this growth is absolutely dwarfed by the explosion of bike share programs in China over the last couple of years. The country now has more than 400,000 bike share bikes in operation across dozens of cities with programs, with the vast majority installed since 2012. To put this in perspective, there are an estimated 822,00 bikes in operation around the world — so China has more bikes than all other countries combined. The individual country with the next-highest number of bikes, France, has just 45,000.

China has 8 cities with bigger bike share systems than all of America | Vox

The growth of bike share programs is gaining momentum in the US. But this growth is absolutely dwarfed by the explosion of bike share programs in China over the last couple of years. The country now has more than 400,000 bike share bikes in operation across dozens of cities with programs, with the vast majority installed since 2012. To put this in perspective, there are an estimated 822,00 bikes in operation around the world — so China has more bikes than all other countries combined. The individual country with the next-highest number of bikes, France, has just 45,000.

Three Energy Solutions That Throw Caution to the Wind | People for Smarter Cities
With global energy consumption increasing, demand is surging for renewable energy resources. Read how three smart innovations in wind energy are helping to deliver maximum power with minimal impact.

Three Energy Solutions That Throw Caution to the Wind | People for Smarter Cities

With global energy consumption increasing, demand is surging for renewable energy resources. Read how three smart innovations in wind energy are helping to deliver maximum power with minimal impact.

The Big Buy-In: How a City and Its Citizens Got Smart About Water | People for Smarter Cities
It’s no secret that the world’s freshwater resources are limited and decreasing. At the same time, domestic consumption and water waste are increasing. In the U.S., a typical household consumes about 260 gallons a day, most of which could be significantly reduced through small behavioral changes. But getting citizen buy-in is not an easy task. Here’s how one city spurred its residents to take action.

The Big Buy-In: How a City and Its Citizens Got Smart About Water | People for Smarter Cities

It’s no secret that the world’s freshwater resources are limited and decreasing. At the same time, domestic consumption and water waste are increasing. In the U.S., a typical household consumes about 260 gallons a day, most of which could be significantly reduced through small behavioral changes. But getting citizen buy-in is not an easy task. Here’s how one city spurred its residents to take action.

Using Big Data to Make Education Smarter | P4SC
Numbers have always been a core part of any education. Now with smart analytics, schools can harness the power of data to better measure and track student performance in real time. Read how that adds up to fewer dropouts at one school system that has instituted a program of prevention through prediction.

Using Big Data to Make Education Smarter | P4SC

Numbers have always been a core part of any education. Now with smart analytics, schools can harness the power of data to better measure and track student performance in real time. Read how that adds up to fewer dropouts at one school system that has instituted a program of prevention through prediction.

The Sidewalk of the Future Is Not So Concrete | CityLab
Some cities have started to rethink the traditional sidewalk. Local governments and technology companies all over the world are considering new ways of building pedestrian pathways that go beyond the common mix of cement and aggregate we know as concrete. These materials have broadened not only how cities construct sidewalks but also the very notion of what a sidewalk can be. They can now enhance walkability, generate renewable energy, and improve public safety, even as they withstand all those tree roots that have been breaking concrete slabs for decades.

The Sidewalk of the Future Is Not So Concrete | CityLab

Some cities have started to rethink the traditional sidewalk. Local governments and technology companies all over the world are considering new ways of building pedestrian pathways that go beyond the common mix of cement and aggregate we know as concrete. These materials have broadened not only how cities construct sidewalks but also the very notion of what a sidewalk can be. They can now enhance walkability, generate renewable energy, and improve public safety, even as they withstand all those tree roots that have been breaking concrete slabs for decades.