The Big Buy-In: How a City and Its Citizens Got Smart About Water | People for Smarter Cities
It’s no secret that the world’s freshwater resources are limited and decreasing. At the same time, domestic consumption and water waste are increasing. In the U.S., a typical household consumes about 260 gallons a day, most of which could be significantly reduced through small behavioral changes. But getting citizen buy-in is not an easy task. Here’s how one city spurred its residents to take action.

The Big Buy-In: How a City and Its Citizens Got Smart About Water | People for Smarter Cities

It’s no secret that the world’s freshwater resources are limited and decreasing. At the same time, domestic consumption and water waste are increasing. In the U.S., a typical household consumes about 260 gallons a day, most of which could be significantly reduced through small behavioral changes. But getting citizen buy-in is not an easy task. Here’s how one city spurred its residents to take action.

Using Big Data to Make Education Smarter | P4SC
Numbers have always been a core part of any education. Now with smart analytics, schools can harness the power of data to better measure and track student performance in real time. Read how that adds up to fewer dropouts at one school system that has instituted a program of prevention through prediction.

Using Big Data to Make Education Smarter | P4SC

Numbers have always been a core part of any education. Now with smart analytics, schools can harness the power of data to better measure and track student performance in real time. Read how that adds up to fewer dropouts at one school system that has instituted a program of prevention through prediction.

The Sidewalk of the Future Is Not So Concrete | CityLab
Some cities have started to rethink the traditional sidewalk. Local governments and technology companies all over the world are considering new ways of building pedestrian pathways that go beyond the common mix of cement and aggregate we know as concrete. These materials have broadened not only how cities construct sidewalks but also the very notion of what a sidewalk can be. They can now enhance walkability, generate renewable energy, and improve public safety, even as they withstand all those tree roots that have been breaking concrete slabs for decades.

The Sidewalk of the Future Is Not So Concrete | CityLab

Some cities have started to rethink the traditional sidewalk. Local governments and technology companies all over the world are considering new ways of building pedestrian pathways that go beyond the common mix of cement and aggregate we know as concrete. These materials have broadened not only how cities construct sidewalks but also the very notion of what a sidewalk can be. They can now enhance walkability, generate renewable energy, and improve public safety, even as they withstand all those tree roots that have been breaking concrete slabs for decades.

How IBM is using big data to fix Beijing’s pollution crisis | Quartz
IBM has signed a partnership with the Beijing government, which is hoping to tap into the company’s expertise to help tackle the city’s air pollution crisis. IBM’s plan of attack involves some of the buzziest things in tech, including harnessing the processing power of “big data” as well as the “internet of things,” weather modeling, and supercomputing.

How IBM is using big data to fix Beijing’s pollution crisis | Quartz

IBM has signed a partnership with the Beijing government, which is hoping to tap into the company’s expertise to help tackle the city’s air pollution crisis. IBM’s plan of attack involves some of the buzziest things in tech, including harnessing the processing power of “big data” as well as the “internet of things,” weather modeling, and supercomputing.

Game Changer: How Rio Scored Big With Move to Become Smart City | People For Smarter Cities
As thousands of people from around the world flock to Rio de Janeiro for the 2014 World Cup, organizers can sleep a little easier. Thanks to the operations center that Rio set up with IBM, officials can effectively prepare, predict and coordinate the response to any incident. Read how Rio’s decision to become a smart city helped it rise to the top of its game.

Game Changer: How Rio Scored Big With Move to Become Smart City | People For Smarter Cities

As thousands of people from around the world flock to Rio de Janeiro for the 2014 World Cup, organizers can sleep a little easier. Thanks to the operations center that Rio set up with IBM, officials can effectively prepare, predict and coordinate the response to any incident. Read how Rio’s decision to become a smart city helped it rise to the top of its game.

Smarter Cities of the Future Will Be More Open, Social | A Smarter Planet Blog

Forward thinking city leaders are looking to embrace the opportunities enabled by technology to overcome the ever-widening range of these significant challenges. Big data and related analytics delivered from the cloud to highly mobile citizens using powerful social media means of communication are mandatory elements of meeting these challenges.

Four Transportation Ideas That Will Get You Moving | People for Smarter Cities
As city populations surge worldwide, accessible transportation is key to citizens’ well-being. But that access has become more difficult as congested roads and auto pollution take environmental and economic tolls. To help combat these issues, city and government leaders, businesses and citizens are creating unique and sustainable transportation options for the future. Here are four examples that are getting people moving in the right direction: http://ibm.co/1sym9q2

Four Transportation Ideas That Will Get You Moving | People for Smarter Cities

As city populations surge worldwide, accessible transportation is key to citizens’ well-being. But that access has become more difficult as congested roads and auto pollution take environmental and economic tolls. To help combat these issues, city and government leaders, businesses and citizens are creating unique and sustainable transportation options for the future. Here are four examples that are getting people moving in the right direction: http://ibm.co/1sym9q2

These Smart Umbrellas Measure Rainfall Data For Meteorologists (And Send It Back To The Cloud) | FastCompany
A team of Dutch scientists wants to use the crowd instead, by turning umbrellas into mini weather-monitoring stations. Every time it rains, smart umbrellas would use sensors to detect falling drops, and then use Bluetooth to send a report to a smartphone app. As people walk around with umbrellas throughout a city during a storm, each app would send in data to a central system where meteorologists could use it to come up with better predictions.

These Smart Umbrellas Measure Rainfall Data For Meteorologists (And Send It Back To The Cloud) | FastCompany

A team of Dutch scientists wants to use the crowd instead, by turning umbrellas into mini weather-monitoring stations. Every time it rains, smart umbrellas would use sensors to detect falling drops, and then use Bluetooth to send a report to a smartphone app. As people walk around with umbrellas throughout a city during a storm, each app would send in data to a central system where meteorologists could use it to come up with better predictions.

How Chicago Is Building a Better City With Big Data | People For Smarter Cities
Urban design is no longer just for architects and city planners: Citizens also are getting into the act.
Chicago is one example of how data collected from residents transforms urban design. The project’s aim is to highlight how data generated by citizens can be used to make cities a better place to live. Where does this information come from? It can be gathered from sensors on water pipes that detect leaks, for one. Or it could be as simple as data culled from city-to-citizen social-media engagement. Armed with this, architects, planners and engineers can draw up, create and implement programs in areas such as public safety and transportation that are designed to improve residents’ quality of life.

How Chicago Is Building a Better City With Big Data | People For Smarter Cities

Urban design is no longer just for architects and city planners: Citizens also are getting into the act.

Chicago is one example of how data collected from residents transforms urban design. The project’s aim is to highlight how data generated by citizens can be used to make cities a better place to live. Where does this information come from? It can be gathered from sensors on water pipes that detect leaks, for one. Or it could be as simple as data culled from city-to-citizen social-media engagement. Armed with this, architects, planners and engineers can draw up, create and implement programs in areas such as public safety and transportation that are designed to improve residents’ quality of life.