Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany
The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany

The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

This High Concentration Photovoltaic Thermal System (HCPVT) can harness the energy of 2,000 suns and provide fresh water and air conditioning in remote locations. The prototype HCPVT system under development uses a large parabolic dish, made from a multitude of mirror facets, which is attached to a tracking system that determines the best angle based on the position of the sun. Once aligned, the sun’s rays reflect off the mirror onto several microchannel-liquid cooled receivers with triple junction photovoltaic chips — each 1x1 centimeter chip can convert 200-250 watts, on average, over a typical eight hour day in a sunny region.
Read more: http://huff.to/11vTQGE

This High Concentration Photovoltaic Thermal System (HCPVT) can harness the energy of 2,000 suns and provide fresh water and air conditioning in remote locations. The prototype HCPVT system under development uses a large parabolic dish, made from a multitude of mirror facets, which is attached to a tracking system that determines the best angle based on the position of the sun. Once aligned, the sun’s rays reflect off the mirror onto several microchannel-liquid cooled receivers with triple junction photovoltaic chips — each 1x1 centimeter chip can convert 200-250 watts, on average, over a typical eight hour day in a sunny region.

Read more: http://huff.to/11vTQGE

Earth Day Collaboration Aims to Harness Energy of 2000 Suns | Building a Smarter Planet

It would take only two percent of the Sahara Desert’s land area to supply the world’s electricity needs. Unfortunately, current solar technologies are too expensive and slow to produce, require rare Earth minerals and lack the efficiency to make such massive installations practical. To address this, scientists at Airlight Energy have teamed up with IBM and Swiss university partners to develop an affordable photovoltaic system that is capable of concentrating, on average, the power of 2,000 suns, onto hundreds of 1×1 cm chips.

Solar Roads, Charging Roads, And The Future Of Transportation | FastCompany
Here are two great innovations, that could potentially have a profound impact on the future of transportation.
Solar Roads: Imagine that you could replace the concrete or asphalt with solar cells beneath a layer of glass. Operating at 15% efficiency the U.S. road system would provide more than four times our current electricity needs, or about as much electricity as the whole world uses. It’s a lot of potential power.
Charging Roads: What if an electric vehicle can be recharged without wires while on road. Using magnetic induction technology, a company called Wave is trying to achieve just that. 

Solar Roads, Charging Roads, And The Future Of Transportation | FastCompany

Here are two great innovations, that could potentially have a profound impact on the future of transportation.

Solar Roads: Imagine that you could replace the concrete or asphalt with solar cells beneath a layer of glass. Operating at 15% efficiency the U.S. road system would provide more than four times our current electricity needs, or about as much electricity as the whole world uses. It’s a lot of potential power.

Charging Roads: What if an electric vehicle can be recharged without wires while on road. Using magnetic induction technology, a company called Wave is trying to achieve just that. 

Solar Bus Shelters | EarthTechling
With an abundance of sunshine, it’s no wonder that some of the most innovative and successful solar power installations are found in California. Recently, the City of Perris, located in green energy-friendly Riverside County, announced that it would use solar power to transform its ordinary bus stops into miniature power plants.

Solar Bus Shelters | EarthTechling

With an abundance of sunshine, it’s no wonder that some of the most innovative and successful solar power installations are found in California. Recently, the City of Perris, located in green energy-friendly Riverside Countyannounced that it would use solar power to transform its ordinary bus stops into miniature power plants.

nycarra:

Thanks in part to ARRA funding, solar energy capacity in New York City has increased 800 percent since 2007, with many more solar installations in the “pipeline.”  This increase parallels the quadrupling of solar installation companies now doing business in NYC, demonstrating the economic benefits of enabling the solar market in this city of a million rooftops.

Six years ago, NYC had just one megawatt of installed solar power, and the local solar market faced extensive technical, administrative and policy barriers.  A collaborative partnership, led by the City University of New York (CUNY), was formed that includes the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability and the New York City Economic Development Corporation.  Together they are implementing a plan to systematically remove those barriers in order to support large-scale solar energy market growth.  The partners have secured three consecutive U.S. Department of Energy grants, including an ARRA grant, that led to the development of five NYC Solar Empowerment Zones, NYC Solar Ombudsman, and the world’s largest LiDAR based map: the NYC Solar Map.  The map utilizes 15 billion points of data to estimate the solar energy potential for every building in NYC.  Since its launch in June of 2011, the map has received over 150,000 hits, serving as an interactive tool for New Yorkers by educating them about the costs, benefits, and payback periods of investing in solar installations for their properties.

City University of New York, NYC Economic Development Corporation and Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Sustainability, Solar Market Transformation

Lunar cubit - Solar Pyramids

'lunar cubit' is a site specific proposal to be constructed in abu dhabi, outside masdar city, 
and once completed will be the world’s first zero-carbon metropolis. 
winner of the 2010 UAE design competition for energy generating public art of the 
land art generator initiative, the project combines artistic vision with sustainable design and engineering.

overall, lunar cubit consists of nine pyramids that mark the lunar phases. 
it is constructed from solar panels that collect energy during the day and are illuminated at night, 
inversely proportional to the lunar cycle. the structures are made from glass and amorphous silicon, 
giving them the appearance of onyx polished to a mirror finish.

lunar cubit’ provides a personal experience, where one is able to literally reach out and touch a 
1.74 MW utility scale power plant in the form of nine monolithic pyramids. 
visitors are encouraged to walk amongst these beacons. stone paths flow around the structures 
in a repeating pattern mirroring buried electrical cables, conducting electrons from the 
outer pyramids to the central pyramid where inside, they are transformed into AC energy 
and transmitted to the local utility grid. co-locating walking paths and conduits minimize 
the footprint of disturbed land during construction, allowing the maximum amount of 
natural ecosystem to remain relatively untouched.