Rotating Solar House Generates Five Times The Energy It Consumes | Techcrunch
What’s cooler than a rotating house? One whose solar panels produce five times the energy the house uses. That’s pretty incredible, considering that even zero-energy structures are rare. German architect Rolf Disch built the home, called Heliotrope, to follow the sun throughout the day. The structure features triple panes of thermally insulated glass to strike a balance between letting light in and keeping the house cooler inside.

Rotating Solar House Generates Five Times The Energy It Consumes | Techcrunch

What’s cooler than a rotating house? One whose solar panels produce five times the energy the house uses. That’s pretty incredible, considering that even zero-energy structures are rare. German architect Rolf Disch built the home, called Heliotrope, to follow the sun throughout the day. The structure features triple panes of thermally insulated glass to strike a balance between letting light in and keeping the house cooler inside.

smarterplanet:

 New Rollable Solar Panels Make Roof Installations a Snap! | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World

We cover a lot of solar panel technologies here at Inhabitat — some are pie in the sky, some are a few years down the road and some are exciting products that are actually available today. SoloPower’s new flexible rolling solar panels are in the latter group, and they stand to significantly reduce production and installation costs. With a notable 11% efficiency, the easily-installed thin-film panels may be able to give traditional silicon panels a run for the money.

electricpower:

Tuscon Utility Adding 160 Megawatts of Renewable Power 
While some Arizona legislators seem to have a bit of trouble deciphering the U.S. constitution, the state’s utility companies are wide awake when it comes to shifting out of fossil fuels and adopting renewable energy.  Tuscon Electric Power (TEP) has joined the rush to renewables with an announcement that it will purchase the electrical output from solar, landfill gas, and wind installations, which when completed will total almost 160 megawatts or enough to power about 30,000 homes.
The greatest amount will come from ten new solar power installations, which together will account for 107 of the 160 MW.  TEP anticipates completion of these along with the wind and landfill gas projects in 2011 or 2012.
CleanTechnica

electricpower:

Tuscon Utility Adding 160 Megawatts of Renewable Power

While some Arizona legislators seem to have a bit of trouble deciphering the U.S. constitution, the state’s utility companies are wide awake when it comes to shifting out of fossil fuels and adopting renewable energy.  Tuscon Electric Power (TEP) has joined the rush to renewables with an announcement that it will purchase the electrical output from solar, landfill gas, and wind installations, which when completed will total almost 160 megawatts or enough to power about 30,000 homes.

The greatest amount will come from ten new solar power installations, which together will account for 107 of the 160 MW.  TEP anticipates completion of these along with the wind and landfill gas projects in 2011 or 2012.

CleanTechnica

edificecomplex:

electricpower:

20 Universities to Compete in DoE-sponsored Solar Decathlon to Build Most Efficient Solar-Powered Home 
Department of Energy has announced the 20 teams from as many universities which will compete in the Solar Decathlon to design, build and operate the most affordable and energy-efficient solar-powered home. The event will be held at the National Mall in Washington D.C. in the Fall 2011.
 
The DoE intends to a) educate students and public about the various energy-efficient technologies having application in home designing, b) introduce to the public the advantages of energy-efficient homes and use of renewable energy and c) train the students in energy efficiency technologies. The teams will be evaluated on their performance through a series of contests involving various aspects of designing, building and operating a solar-powered home. The students will be evaluated on parameters such as architectural, economical and engineering aspects.
Universities selected for the 2011 Decathlon include Ghent University (Belgium), Purdue University (Indiana), Tonji University (Shanghai), University of Calgary (Canada) and Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand).
CleanTechnica

edificecomplex:

electricpower:

20 Universities to Compete in DoE-sponsored Solar Decathlon to Build Most Efficient Solar-Powered Home

Department of Energy has announced the 20 teams from as many universities which will compete in the Solar Decathlon to design, build and operate the most affordable and energy-efficient solar-powered home. The event will be held at the National Mall in Washington D.C. in the Fall 2011.

The DoE intends to a) educate students and public about the various energy-efficient technologies having application in home designing, b) introduce to the public the advantages of energy-efficient homes and use of renewable energy and c) train the students in energy efficiency technologies. The teams will be evaluated on their performance through a series of contests involving various aspects of designing, building and operating a solar-powered home. The students will be evaluated on parameters such as architectural, economical and engineering aspects.

Universities selected for the 2011 Decathlon include Ghent University (Belgium), Purdue University (Indiana), Tonji University (Shanghai), University of Calgary (Canada) and Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand).

CleanTechnica

Denver international airport’s solar energy initiative

Obviously fossil fuels have hit their peak and it’s time to invest in alternative energy, one that is renewable and has no pollution. Denver has always been on the forefront for green technology with their green data centers to their greenhouse gas reduction strategy. Truthfully it makes me proud to live in a city that is concerned about climate change and sustainability. Denver has also had its failures; 10 years ago, Denver airport implemented the computerized baggage-handling system. Unfortunately this futuristic technology failed and was known to misplace anything that it got a hold of. I do however applaud them for having the audacity to try something new unlike rest of the airports in America.

It’s actually quite embarrassing when you fly in to LGA or ATL from Seoul Incheon or the Hong Kong airport and you see how behind the times America is. But just recently Denver international airport completed the construction of its solar project, which generates an average of 3.5 million kWh of clean electricity annually.

This is awesome because this could potentially reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere by more than five million pounds each year. These are just couple of reasons why Denver, Colorado, USA is the smartest city.

electricpower:

Konarka’s Power Plastic Turns Buildings into Power Plants 
Solar energy innovator Konarka is out to prove that you can have your sustainable cake and eat it, too.  The Massachusetts-based company has launched a pilot project that will integrate its proprietary Power Plastic solar panels into the non-loadbearing exterior wall of a building, called acurtain wall. The new design makes solar energy a seamless part of the building rather than an afterthought.
The solar energy curtain wall project will be constructed in Tamarac, Florida, at an office building owned by Arch Aluminum & Glass Co., Inc. Arch and Konarka have teamed up to demonstrate that an active solar glass wall could enable the structure of a building to generate sustainable energy for its internal operations.  For now the partners appear to be focused on commercial and industrial applications, but if the curtain wall proves cost-effective it could also open the door for integrated solar panels in a wide range of residential and institutional structures.
CleanTechnica

electricpower:

Konarka’s Power Plastic Turns Buildings into Power Plants

Solar energy innovator Konarka is out to prove that you can have your sustainable cake and eat it, too.  The Massachusetts-based company has launched a pilot project that will integrate its proprietary Power Plastic solar panels into the non-loadbearing exterior wall of a building, called acurtain wall. The new design makes solar energy a seamless part of the building rather than an afterthought.

The solar energy curtain wall project will be constructed in Tamarac, Florida, at an office building owned by Arch Aluminum & Glass Co., Inc. Arch and Konarka have teamed up to demonstrate that an active solar glass wall could enable the structure of a building to generate sustainable energy for its internal operations.  For now the partners appear to be focused on commercial and industrial applications, but if the curtain wall proves cost-effective it could also open the door for integrated solar panels in a wide range of residential and institutional structures.

CleanTechnica

electricpower:

Group Buying = Lowest Price for Solar. Ever. 
What with the Vice President promoting the PACE super affordable model  of city financing for solar and the econo-apocalypse-related drop in solar panel prices, you’d think that solar was in the bag by now, but group buying on top of all that will still buy the cheapest solar for your roof.
One Block off the Grid’s completely unique model of group buying combined with the financing of their partnering banker SunRun (which offers one of the few solar financing options to remain viable in the downturn) has made this the cheapest way for  going solar ever.
As One  Block off the Grid (1BOG) becomes more known nationally, grassroots demand is bringing their volunteer-based campaigns to more cities around the country. The idea is to mass produce solar installations so they can be as cheap as utility scale solar.
CleanTechnica

electricpower:

Group Buying = Lowest Price for Solar. Ever.

What with the Vice President promoting the PACE super affordable model of city financing for solar and the econo-apocalypse-related drop in solar panel prices, you’d think that solar was in the bag by now, but group buying on top of all that will still buy the cheapest solar for your roof.

One Block off the Grid’s completely unique model of group buying combined with the financing of their partnering banker SunRun (which offers one of the few solar financing options to remain viable in the downturn) has made this the cheapest way for going solar ever.

As One Block off the Grid (1BOG) becomes more known nationally, grassroots demand is bringing their volunteer-based campaigns to more cities around the country. The idea is to mass produce solar installations so they can be as cheap as utility scale solar.

CleanTechnica

gangurru:

Technology Review: A Better Solar Collector

Looking to make solar panels cheaper, MIT researchers have created sheets of glass coated with advanced organic dyes that more efficiently concentrate sunlight. The researchers, whose results appear in this week’s issue of Science, say that the coated glass sheets could eventually make solar power as cheap as electricity from fossil fuels.

gangurru:

Technology Review: A Better Solar Collector

Looking to make solar panels cheaper, MIT researchers have created sheets of glass coated with advanced organic dyes that more efficiently concentrate sunlight. The researchers, whose results appear in this week’s issue of Science, say that the coated glass sheets could eventually make solar power as cheap as electricity from fossil fuels.