smartercities:

Volvo Tests A Road That Can Charge Cars And Trucks | FastCompany
Charging electric vehicles while they are on the move may seem a bit out-there. But, in fact, we already do it for major groups of vehicles—trams and trains, for instance. French cities have completely wireless trams, and their record is good. After 10 years and about 7.5 million miles, they haven’t reported serious problems.
In Sweden, Volvo is applying the same technology to roads, opening up the possibility that people would no longer have to fear getting stranded by a dead battery—a major hurdle to people’s willingness to buy an electric car. 

smartercities:

Volvo Tests A Road That Can Charge Cars And Trucks | FastCompany

Charging electric vehicles while they are on the move may seem a bit out-there. But, in fact, we already do it for major groups of vehicles—trams and trains, for instance. French cities have completely wireless trams, and their record is good. After 10 years and about 7.5 million miles, they haven’t reported serious problems.

In Sweden, Volvo is applying the same technology to roads, opening up the possibility that people would no longer have to fear getting stranded by a dead battery—a major hurdle to people’s willingness to buy an electric car. 

emergentfutures:

Here come the 3D printed cars, courtesy of Canada
 
 
The car in this case is the Urbee, a tiny three-wheeled economy car with an electric motor, internal combustion engine, and 3D-printed frame. Designed by the Manitoba-based Kor EcoLogic, the Urbee was manufactured using a Stratasys Fortus printer, which is able to cut down on parts by printing the Urbee in roughly 50 large blocks. 
 
Full Story: Washington Post

emergentfutures:

Here come the 3D printed cars, courtesy of Canada

 

 

The car in this case is the Urbee, a tiny three-wheeled economy car with an electric motor, internal combustion engine, and 3D-printed frame. Designed by the Manitoba-based Kor EcoLogic, the Urbee was manufactured using a Stratasys Fortus printer, which is able to cut down on parts by printing the Urbee in roughly 50 large blocks. 

 

Full Story: Washington Post

A Scooter That Folds Into a Carry-on Luggage | EarthTechling
Xor Motors, based in Aix-en-Provence, France, is – at first glance – just another electric scooter manufacturer. But it offers a twist. As can be seen seen in this video, the Xor X02 electric scooter can actually be folded small enough to be rolled away by it rider.

A Scooter That Folds Into a Carry-on Luggage | EarthTechling

Xor Motors, based in Aix-en-Provence, France, is – at first glance – just another electric scooter manufacturer. But it offers a twist. As can be seen seen in this video, the Xor X02 electric scooter can actually be folded small enough to be rolled away by it rider.

Africa May Leapfrog the World in Big Data | ReadWriteEnterprise
Africa is already well known for leapfrogging the rest of the world in use of mobile money, but African countries now have another big leapfrogging opportunity: big data analytics.
Across the continent, there’s a tremendous potential for using data analytics in powerful new ways in a wide range of industries and domains, from telecommunications and banking to transportation and healthcare.
"Going forward, data is going to be THE source of competitive advantage" - IBM Chairman and CEO, Ginni Rometty at the IBM CIO Leadership Exchange in Johannesburg, South Africa

Africa May Leapfrog the World in Big Data | ReadWriteEnterprise

Africa is already well known for leapfrogging the rest of the world in use of mobile money, but African countries now have another big leapfrogging opportunity: big data analytics.

Across the continent, there’s a tremendous potential for using data analytics in powerful new ways in a wide range of industries and domains, from telecommunications and banking to transportation and healthcare.

"Going forward, data is going to be THE source of competitive advantage" - IBM Chairman and CEO, Ginni Rometty at the IBM CIO Leadership Exchange in Johannesburg, South Africa

Bikes and Buses Propel Mexico City to Prize in Sustainable Transport | National Geographic

Bicycles, pedestrian-friendly plazas and walkways, new bus lines, and parking meters are combining to transform parts of Mexico City from a traffic nightmare to a commuter’s paradise. The Mexican capital, one of the world’s most populated urban areas, has captured this year’s Sustainable Transport Award, the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) 

Bikes and Buses Propel Mexico City to Prize in Sustainable Transport | National Geographic

Bicycles, pedestrian-friendly plazas and walkways, new bus lines, and parking meters are combining to transform parts of Mexico City from a traffic nightmare to a commuter’s paradise. The Mexican capital, one of the world’s most populated urban areas, has captured this year’s Sustainable Transport Award, the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) 

Join the Mobility Revolution with These Five Apps - Technology Review
Just in time: When’s the bus coming? NextBus takes  away the guesswork: the app tells you exactly how many minutes away your  bus is. It works using GPS signals from devices installed inside city  buses. Boston has signed on, and so has San Francisco, where the app  also keeps track of trolleys and cable cars.
NextBus is a 15-year-old company, and it was “tough going” for many  years, says chief technology officer Michael Smith. Originally, riders  got updates by calling a number or consulting bus-stop displays. Now the  rise of smart phones has made the system much more powerful. About 30  percent of NextBus’s 800,000 daily users access the app via iPhones or  other smart devices.
NextBus charges transit agencies a few hundred dollars per bus per  year to use its service, and more if the buses don’t have GPS yet. The  fee Los Angeles pays to use the software in its 2,500-vehicle fleet:  $1.5 million over three years. But that’s quickly made back in increased  ridership. Bus-stop haters can now arrive just in time.

Join the Mobility Revolution with These Five Apps - Technology Review

Just in time: When’s the bus coming? NextBus takes away the guesswork: the app tells you exactly how many minutes away your bus is. It works using GPS signals from devices installed inside city buses. Boston has signed on, and so has San Francisco, where the app also keeps track of trolleys and cable cars.

NextBus is a 15-year-old company, and it was “tough going” for many years, says chief technology officer Michael Smith. Originally, riders got updates by calling a number or consulting bus-stop displays. Now the rise of smart phones has made the system much more powerful. About 30 percent of NextBus’s 800,000 daily users access the app via iPhones or other smart devices.

NextBus charges transit agencies a few hundred dollars per bus per year to use its service, and more if the buses don’t have GPS yet. The fee Los Angeles pays to use the software in its 2,500-vehicle fleet: $1.5 million over three years. But that’s quickly made back in increased ridership. Bus-stop haters can now arrive just in time.

latimes:

In traffic-choked L.A., a car lane is given to bicycles:  City officials unveil a new 2.2-mile path stretching along 7th Street from Catalina Avenue in Koreatown to Figueroa Street downtown. All that was needed was paint, a few signs and some traffic light adjustments.
Photo: A cyclist uses the new bike lane on 7th Street in downtown Los Angeles. The lane used to be for cars only. Credit: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

In traffic-choked L.A., a car lane is given to bicycles: City officials unveil a new 2.2-mile path stretching along 7th Street from Catalina Avenue in Koreatown to Figueroa Street downtown. All that was needed was paint, a few signs and some traffic light adjustments.

Photo: A cyclist uses the new bike lane on 7th Street in downtown Los Angeles. The lane used to be for cars only. Credit: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

(via captainplanit)