Despite its vast popularity local authorities tend to either ignore or prohibit urban farming on a premise that it is unsightly, unhygienic and incompatible with progress and modernity. For many cities this vision of development along with zoning regulations and planning practices, remain unchanged since colonial times and are increasingly divorced from today’s rapid change and local specificities.

Landscape architecture at its best: Tanghe River Park, China

imaginemileend:

Kongjian Yu of Turenscape took a slum and a garbage dump and turned it into this:

(photo found here.)

If they could do that, then certainly we think of something respectable for an abandoned field (that is already 90% of the way there) in the Mile-End, n’est-ce pas?!

I love it, what a great design.

Instead of simply laying grass and putting up street lights and benches (like most cities in Canada would do in a similar situation), the public authorities and the design crew in this Chinese example have opted for something that prioritizes biodiversity and nature, as well as world-class design.

(found here.)

Any close critique of the details — from the plants chosen to the benches designed — will show you how seriously those responsible for this project approached their task.

They have achieved something here that is every bit as successful as the High Line in New York — in terms of public space. And to give them credit, the High Line was probably better before the re-design than it is now …

…whereas it is clear that this Chinese re-design is a complete success, and one that started from an utter failure.

(found here.)

In terms of biodiversity, this project clearly beats out the High Line, but there is no real reason to compare the two on this measure since the circumstances are so different. Regardless, very impressive.

Kudos. This says it all:

(found here.)

via: American Society of Landscape Architects

trendd:

This is an interesting design comp. Complete with flying cars and everything.
“As part of the Icsid World Design Congress 2009, “Design Difference: Designing our World 2050”, WOHA spearheaded a vertical studio to explore future scenarios for Singapore.
The task that the studio posed themselves was to make Singapore safe from rising sea levels while shrinking the ecological footprint of the country to the size of the island. The projects are testing new cross-programmed infrastructure, urban and architectural typologies to address the pressing issues of water, food and energy security. Proposals include residential power plants, multilevel factory / agri-villages, and resort dykes.”
Singapore 2050 Masterplan / WOHA-ArchDaily

trendd:

This is an interesting design comp. Complete with flying cars and everything.

“As part of the Icsid World Design Congress 2009, “Design Difference: Designing our World 2050”, WOHA spearheaded a vertical studio to explore future scenarios for Singapore.

The task that the studio posed themselves was to make Singapore safe from rising sea levels while shrinking the ecological footprint of the country to the size of the island. The projects are testing new cross-programmed infrastructure, urban and architectural typologies to address the pressing issues of water, food and energy security. Proposals include residential power plants, multilevel factory / agri-villages, and resort dykes.”

Singapore 2050 Masterplan / WOHA-ArchDaily

sojamo:

binary waves
by lab[au]. “the belgian design studio lab[au] placed their cybernetic installation binary waves in paris to measure and display the various flows of its surroundings. the urban installation measured people, bikes, cars, trains and electromagnetic fields in real time and displayed them through luminous, sonic and kinetic rules.” via designboom and hazel-lim

sojamo:

binary waves

by lab[au]. “the belgian design studio lab[au] placed their cybernetic installation binary waves in paris to measure and display the various flows of its surroundings. the urban installation measured people, bikes, cars, trains and electromagnetic fields in real time and displayed them through luminous, sonic and kinetic rules.” via designboom and hazel-lim

archresearch:

The most unusual feature of the express system [in Curitiba, Brazil] is its 100 tubular bus shelters. Passengers pay their fares at a turnstile at the end of a clear tube and then wait inside for their bus, which they enter from sliding doors in the tube. The design speeds up loading and unloading, Lerner says. In addition, computers can keep track of the number of passengers waiting in the tubes and dispatch buses accordingly. A similar system has been tested in New York City.
Photo via www.24en.com
Text via Herbst, Kris. Planning. Chicago: Sep 1992.  Vol. 58, Iss. 9; pg. 24, 4 pgs

archresearch:

The most unusual feature of the express system [in Curitiba, Brazil] is its 100 tubular bus shelters. Passengers pay their fares at a turnstile at the end of a clear tube and then wait inside for their bus, which they enter from sliding doors in the tube. The design speeds up loading and unloading, Lerner says. In addition, computers can keep track of the number of passengers waiting in the tubes and dispatch buses accordingly. A similar system has been tested in New York City.

Photo via www.24en.com

Text via Herbst, Kris. Planning. Chicago: Sep 1992. Vol. 58, Iss. 9; pg. 24, 4 pgs