Vertical Farming Is Key to the Smart Cities of the Future | STATETECH
Smart cities could look very different from today’s urban centers. Streetlights could be communicating with bus stops, and subway trains could be solar powered. Population growth will force local government leaders to rethink more than just transportation and housing. As the population increases, the real estate needed to grow the food we eat will become increasingly scarce. Some experts have suggested that a new agricultural approach called vertical farming, also known as urban farming, could solve this problem. In a model that is already being tested in Singapore, crops are grown indoors in tall buildings. The benefits are extensive, the technology is powerful and the results are delicious.

Vertical Farming Is Key to the Smart Cities of the Future | STATETECH

Smart cities could look very different from today’s urban centers. Streetlights could be communicating with bus stops, and subway trains could be solar powered. Population growth will force local government leaders to rethink more than just transportation and housing. As the population increases, the real estate needed to grow the food we eat will become increasingly scarce. Some experts have suggested that a new agricultural approach called vertical farming, also known as urban farming, could solve this problem. In a model that is already being tested in Singapore, crops are grown indoors in tall buildings. The benefits are extensive, the technology is powerful and the results are delicious.

smiletouchlove:

By the year 2050, nearly 80% of the earth’s population will reside in urban centers. Applying the most conservative estimates to current demographic trends, the human population will increase by about 3 billion people during the interim. An estimated 109 hectares of new land (about 20% more land than is represented by the country of Brazil) will be needed to grow enough food to feed them, if traditional farming practices continue as they are practiced today. At present, throughout the world, over 80% of the land that is suitable for raising crops is in use (sources: FAO and NASA). Historically, some 15% of that has been laid waste by poor management practices. What can be done to avoid this impending disaster?

(via edificecomplex)

CBC News - Technology & Science - Growing crops in buildings proposed as solution to world’s food woes
The idea is to grow food inside buildings — not conventional greenhouses, but multi-storey buildings, quite likely in cities — in closed ecosystems using hydroponics rather than soil, and without the use of pesticides.

CBC News - Technology & Science - Growing crops in buildings proposed as solution to world’s food woes

The idea is to grow food inside buildings — not conventional greenhouses, but multi-storey buildings, quite likely in cities — in closed ecosystems using hydroponics rather than soil, and without the use of pesticides.

trendd:

Vertical Farms
I am sure that you can tell by now that I have been going through my environmental/architecture blogs on the reader, but I also love the idea of vertical farming in urban environments.
This article goes through the problem and the theory behind vertical farms.
Inhabitat » Smarter Cities: Vertical Farming Could Ease World’s Agricultural Woes

trendd:

Vertical Farms

I am sure that you can tell by now that I have been going through my environmental/architecture blogs on the reader, but I also love the idea of vertical farming in urban environments.

This article goes through the problem and the theory behind vertical farms.

Inhabitat » Smarter Cities: Vertical Farming Could Ease World’s Agricultural Woes